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Photo: Gen. John Nicholson, Resolute Support Commander, visits with with key leadership in Ghazni, Afghanistan. (US Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Robert Trujillo)

FBI probing Kushner's contacts with Russian officials 6 MIN, 31 SEC

President Trump returned from Europe to new reports about FBI investigations of his inner circle. Reuters reports one subject of inquiry: did the head of a Russian-owned bank propose to the President's son-in-law, Jared Kusher, that economic sanctions be relaxed so that Russian banks could offer financing to people with ties to the President? Jonathan Landay is reporting the story.

Guests:
Jonathan Landay, Reuters (@JonathanLanday)

Is the US fighting a permanent war in Afghanistan? 34 MIN, 30 SEC

Sixteen years after September 11th, the Trump Administration is divided over America's longest war. Since the peak of 100,000 American soldiers their number is now just 8500 soldiers — at a cost of $3.1 billion a month. Now the Pentagon wants to send 5000 more. But the Trump White House is divided. Advocates of continued US involvement say it's all about the Taliban gaining strength and even more extreme groups now involved in the country. Skeptics point to massive financial corruption and ask if there's any plan for ending a conflict that's killed and wounded so many American soldiers for so long.

Guests:
Eric Schmitt, New York Times (@ericschmittNYT)
Kate Clark, Afghanistan Analysts Network (@KateClark66)
Andrew Bacevich, Boston University
J. Kael Weston, former State Department advisor

More:
Clark on the 'Nicholson plan,' a bid to tilt the Afghan war in the government's favor
Bacevich's 'America's War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History'

The Mirror Test

J. Kael Weston

Falling energy prices could force closure of Three Mile Island 8 MIN, 42 SEC


Photo by Raymond Shobe

Thirty-eight years ago, one of two nuclear reactors at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania suffered a partial meltdown and had to shut down.  It was the worst accident of its kind in American history, with "significant" releases of radiation -- but no extensive health affects -- according to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. That reactor was shut down, and now the second may have to close — 15 years before it's due for a license renewal.  Christina Simeone is director of policy and external affairs at the University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Energy Policy Center

Guests:
Christina Simeone, University of Pennsylvania (@SimeoneEnergy)

More:
Three Mile Island's near meltdown: 14 white-knuckle moments from 38 years ago

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