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FROM THIS EPISODE

Photo: Director of the Office of Management and Budget Mick Mulvaney speaks about the budget agreement reached by Congress during a press briefing at the White House in Washington.

Did Pope Francis make an impression on Trump? 6 MIN, 31 SEC

Before going to Brussels, where he'll meet with NATO leaders tomorrow, President Trump was in Rome today to visit the Pope. Mr. Trump arrived at the apostolic palace in an armored limo. Pope Francis came in a Ford Focus. They met in private for about 30 minutes. Joshua McElwee, Vatican correspondent for the independent National Catholic Reporter, has more on the meeting.

Guests:
Joshua McElwee, National Catholic Reporter (@joshjmac)

War on poverty or war against the poor? 32 MIN, 12 SEC

The White House budget request is called A New Foundation for American Greatness, in tune with the best-known slogan of the Trump campaign. Massive cuts in safety-net programs, from Medicaid to food stamps, are supposed to get people off the dole and into the workforce. Where are the jobs? Massive tax cuts for the wealthy are expected to trickle down and be offset by growth in the economy. It's a formula that hasn't worked before, and the Budget Director admits that $2 trillion in revenue has been double counted.

Guests:
Damian Paletta, Washington Post (@damianpaletta)
Peter Morici, University of Maryland (@pmorici1)
Seth Hanlon, Center for American Progress (@SethHanlon)
Molly Reynolds, Brookings Institution (@mollyereynolds)

More:
Paletta on Trump's budget proposal that slashes spending by $3.6 trillion over 10 years
Paletta on some Republicans balking at Trump's plan for steep budget cuts
Morici on Trump's bold plan to invigorate the economy, banish pessimism and debt
Hanlon on Trump's small-business tax cut, a cut for Trump and fellow millionaires
Reynolds on Trump's budget request putting Congress on a rocky path

The Manchester attack and the new European jihadist 10 MIN, 25 SEC


Greater Manchester Police Constable Ian Hopkins
gives an update on Monday's terror attack

In the aftermath of Monday's suicide bombing in Manchester, England, authorities believe the dead bomber was not working alone, but was part of a "network." Four people are now in custody in Britain's worst attack of its kind since 2005. Raffaello Pantucci is author of a book about that incident called, We Love Death as You Love Life: Britain's Suburban Terrorists.  He's also director of international security studies at the Royal United Service Institute.

Guests:
Raffaello Pantucci, Royal United Services Institute (@raffpantucci)

More:
New York Times on evidence photographed at the crime scene

CREDITS

Host:
Warren Olney

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