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Recent Stories

The Brazilian Press Association, or ABI, said that Bolsonaro had unnecessarily endangered a small group of journalists who interviewed him at his official residence.

Mayor Sylvester Turner announced the move on Wednesday, as the city reported hundreds of new cases of COVID-19.

On Wednesday, the North American Scrabble Players Association, which governs tournaments in the U.S. and Canada, said it was removing 236 potentially offensive words from its approved list.

The Ivy League has put all sports on hold until at least January, while Stanford plans to discontinue 11 of its 36 varsity programs after this academic year.

Despite the pandemic, Census Bureau officials say they've determined it's safe enough for visits to unresponsive homes in parts of Connecticut, Indiana, Kansas, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington.

Filed as part of a motion to dismiss charges against one of the officers, the transcripts also appear to show an officer expressing concern about Floyd's well-being in the moments before his death.

Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., wants Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard investigated for "egregious abuse of power." Collins is running for a U.S. Senate seat in the fall.

"I hear a woman in the crowd yell out, 'Don't kill him.' And in that second, I realize that she's talking about me," Vauhxx Booker tells NPR.

A joint effort by former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders to unify Democrats around Biden's candidacy has produced its policy recommendations.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has put a hold on the medical examiner's official autopsy report while it investigates the deputy-involved shooting. The family wants that report released.

With bookings down and cancellations on the rise amid a surge in new COVID-19 cases, United's furloughs will be a "gut punch" to employees when federal coronavirus relief funding runs out.

When the city of Mobile, Ala., took down a statue of a Confederate naval officer it sparked a conversation about what the statue meant, and how the city's Confederate history should be portrayed.

More from KCRW

As bars and restaurants reopened for dine-in service in June, hundreds of front-of-the-house workers bore the brunt of a new workplace.

from Greater LA

Last week, the food editor at the LA Times, Peter Meehan, resigned amid accusations of creating a toxic workplace culture.

from Greater LA

In LA County and nationwide, it’s tough to get a quick appointment and fast results.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Latest

The Pentagon and the Department of Health and Human Services are leading a $10 billion program to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. It’s dubbed “Operation Warp Speed.” The name indicates the hope that an effective vaccine can be developed quickly — by January and the start of a new presidential term.

‘Operation Warp Speed’: US government’s $10 million COVID vaccine project

The Pentagon and the Department of Health and Human Services are leading a $10 billion program to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. It’s dubbed “Operation Warp Speed.” The name indicates the hope that an effective vaccine can be developed quickly — by January and the start of a new presidential term.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

San Diego-based scientist Kimberly Prather says when an asymptomatic person speaks, they produce tiny invisible droplets that can travel much farther than six feet.

The danger of COVID aerosol transmission and why masks are key to protection

San Diego-based scientist Kimberly Prather says when an asymptomatic person speaks, they produce tiny invisible droplets that can travel much farther than six feet.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

As coronavirus cases continue to rise, there’s no telling when live music performances will come back.

What happened to the live music industry after the COVID pandemic hit

As coronavirus cases continue to rise, there’s no telling when live music performances will come back.

from Greater LA

As bars and restaurants reopened for dine-in service in June, hundreds of front-of-the-house workers bore the brunt of a new workplace.

Pandemic serves up anxiety for restaurant workers

As bars and restaurants reopened for dine-in service in June, hundreds of front-of-the-house workers bore the brunt of a new workplace.

from Greater LA

More than    17 million Americans    traveled to Europe in 2018, according to the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Travel and Tourism Office.

How banning US travelers affects Europe’s tourism industry

More than 17 million Americans traveled to Europe in 2018, according to the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Travel and Tourism Office.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

On average, the net worth of white families in the U.S. is nearly 10 times that of Black families.

Moving money into Black banks won’t fix economic inequality, says professor

On average, the net worth of white families in the U.S. is nearly 10 times that of Black families.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Supreme Court ruled on two major cases today involving religious freedom.

Supreme Court rules employers can opt out of Obamacare’s birth control mandate

The Supreme Court ruled on two major cases today involving religious freedom.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LA officials say anyone can get tested for coronavirus, symptoms or no symptoms. But appointments are hard to come by, and results can lag by a week or more.

LA County can’t keep up with coronavirus testing demand

LA officials say anyone can get tested for coronavirus, symptoms or no symptoms. But appointments are hard to come by, and results can lag by a week or more.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand