North Dakota pipeline protests reach boiling point

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Native Americans and supporters from around the world are digging in against an oil pipeline near the Missouri River — despite being struck with batons, sprayed with Mace and charged with crimes. After the protesters lost a battle in court, the Obama Administration asked Energy Transfer, a Fortune 500 Company, to defer construction. But the bulldozers are coming. Sandy Tolan is there for the Los Angeles Times.

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Dakota Access Pipeline protesters square off against police near the Standing Rock Reservation
and the pipeline route outside the little town of Saint Anthony, North Dakota
Photo: Terray Sylvester/Reuters

Protesters aren't the only ones being arrested, so are journalists perceived to be on their side. Deia Schlosberg, producer of a new climate-change documentary, How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can't Change, is facing felony charges.

Credits

Guests:
Sandy Tolan - University of Southern California / Los Angeles Times - @sandy_tolan, Deia Schlosberg - documentary filmmaker and producer - @deiaschlosberg

Hosts:
Warren Olney, KCRW

Producers:
Katie Cooper, Sáša Woodruff, Jenny Hamel