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FROM THIS EPISODE

DnA explores Apple, the FBI and the design of surveillance. Branding expert Sasha Strauss talks about how this fight tests the public's trust in Apple -- and the FBI -- as brands. But surveillance has been built into the fabric of our cities and our culture for centuries. Architect Peter Zellner looks back at city planning as a tool of control. And KCRW's Eric J. Lawrence explores the science fiction that imagined tech-based surveillance -- before it became a reality. MOMA's Paola Antonelli prompted a conversation among scientists, philosophers, activists and the general public on how recent design innovations can be used for violent means. She talks about her new book, Design and Violence. And artist Laurie Lipton explains Techno Rococo, her show of highly-detailed pencil drawings that depict a Dystopian view of our dependence on technology.

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Avishay Artsy

Surveillance Anxiety 14 MIN, 15 SEC

Over the past two weeks, the US Justice Department and Apple have been locked in a battle over whether the computer giant will help the FBI's investigation into the San Bernardino terrorist attack by writing software to defeat encryption technology in an iPhone used by one of the shooters.

This debate reveals the public's conflicted feelings over government surveillance, and their trust in Apple as a brand, says branding expert Sasha Strauss. Surveillance has been built into the fabric of our cities for centuries, says architect Peter Zellner. And it's played a major role in science fiction, says pop culture aficionado Eric J. Lawrence.

Guests:
Peter Zellner, USC / Zellner and Company (@ZellnerPeter)
Sasha Strauss, Innovation Protocol / USC (@SashaStrauss)
Eric J. Lawrence, KCRW DJ (@ericjlawrence)

More:
Apple and the FBI testify on the Hill
Wired argues the Apple fight with the FBI is not about privacy versus security

Design and Violence 7 MIN, 14 SEC

MOMA's Paola Antonelli prompted a conversation among scientists, philosophers, activists and the general public on how recent design innovations can be used for violent means, from "green"bullets to Stuxnet to a "euthanasia roller coaster."She talks about her new book, Design and Violence.

Guests:
Paola Antonelli, Museum of Modern Art (@CuriousOctopus)

More:
The Atlantic explores MOMA's design and violence project

Design and Violence

Anne-Marie Slaughter

Dystopian Drawings 6 MIN, 46 SEC

Artist Laurie Lipton makes highly-detailed, black and white, pencil drawings that depict a Dystopian and darkly humorous view of our dependence on technology. She talks about her worldview as shown in her recent show, Techno Rococo, on display at the Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.


Photo: Lucia Loiso

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