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Hillary Clinton’s being criticized for not initially disclosing a pneumonia diagnosis and her opponents say her illness is proof she’s not up to the task of being president. Of course presidents get sick like the rest of us; but in the past, the public was rarely notified when a sitting president faced health problems. Then, we remember the life of prominent progressive Angeleno, Stanley Sheinbaum, who played major roles in the Israeli peace process and in reshaping the LAPD after Rodney King. Next, for decades the Grand Central Market has been a sort of nucleus of downtown LA – a destination for hungry patrons of all classes and nationalities. Now Jesse Katz calls the market “the front lines of LA’s new demographic wars.” Also, the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy takes us along a journey into the world of Ayahuasca – the new drug of choice for those seeking deep mindfulness. And finally, we remember Anna Dewdney, author of the “Llama Llama” children’s book series, beloved by preschoolers and parents alike.

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

A history of presidential health – disclosed and not 9 MIN, 10 SEC

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s health is in the spotlight after a pneumonia diagnosis forced her to cancel a two day campaign swing through California. She’s being criticized for not disclosing it initially and opponents were quick to claim her illness is proof she’s not up to the task of being commander in chief. Of course, presidents are humans who get sick like the rest of us, but in the past, the public was rarely notified when a sitting president faced health problems. For instance, President William Henry Harrison, who became ill after his inaugural address and died of pneumonia after 32 days on the job. He was one of four presidents – along with Taylor, Harding and Franklin Roosevelt – who died in office.

Guests:
Mike Schlitt, contributor, 'Press Play' (@schlitthappenz)

Remembering prominent progressive Stanley Sheinbaum 8 MIN, 54 SEC

Prominent Angeleno Stanley Sheinbaum died Monday at the age of 96. For most of his life, Sheinbaum was a citizen activist in local, national, and international politics. He played major roles in the Israeli peace process, in reshaping the LAPD after Rodney King, and in the Pentagon Papers. His wealth came through marriage – his wife Betty is the daughter of movie mogul Harry Warner. Together they were powerful fundraisers for progressive politicians and causes, including hosting Bernie Sanders at their Brentwood mansion last year.

Guests:
Raphe Sonenshein, Cal State LA

DTLA's Central Market: 'front lines of LA's new demographic wars' 10 MIN, 2 SEC

For decades, the Grand Central Market on Broadway has been a sort of nucleus of Downtown – a destination for hungry patrons, rich and poor, of all classes and nationalities. The market was established in the tradition of other great food markets of the world, but always with a distinctly Los Angeles flavor – dozens of stalls full of fresh bread, bright produce, traditional Asian herbs, smoked meats of the Eastern European tradition, carne asada. But just as Downtown LA has evolved over the decades, so has Grand Central Market. In a new piece for Los Angeles Magazine, Jesse Katz calls the market “the front lines of LA’s new demographic wars.”

Guests:
Jesse Katz, Los Angeles Magazine (@byjessekatz)

More:
Inside the Gentrification of Grand Central Market

What it's like to vomit, hallucinate and meditate on Ayahuasca 11 MIN, 39 SEC

Ayahuasca is a soupy brown liquid brewed from a leafy vine that grows in remote parts of the Amazon. It’s also currently the drug of choice in places like Brooklyn, Silicon Valley and LA. At any given time, there are probably hundreds of people sitting in ceremonial circles drinking tea, preparing themselves for intense mindfulness. They will vomit, then hallucinate, and see deep into their souls, maybe. Ariel Levy journeyed into the world of Ayahuasca for the New Yorker.

Guests:
Ariel Levy, New Yorker

More:
THE DRUG OF CHOICE FOR THE AGE OF KALE

Remembering 'Llama llama' author Anna Dewdney 7 MIN, 33 SEC

Author Anna Dewdney died recently at her Vermont home of brain cancer. She was 50 years old. Dewdney’s first illustrated children’s book, “Llama Llama Red Pajama,” was first published in 2005. Since then, Llama Llama has become a 10-book series selling more than ten million copies. Maria Russo, Children’s Books Editor at the New York Times Book Review, remembers the author who was beloved by preschoolers and parents alike.

Guests:
Maria Russo, New York Times Book Review (@mariarussonyt)

More:
Anna Dewdney Dies; Author of ‘Llama Llama’ Books Was 50

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