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FROM THIS EPISODE

Every time a mass shooting happens in America, we wonder what can be done to stop it. Do the laws we have now—for background checks, and mental health screening—even target the right people?

And 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Immigration Act into law. In 1965, 84 percent of Americans were white. Today, due largely in part to the Immigration Act, the white population has shrunk to around 60 percent. This had a profound effect on Los Angeles.

Next, a movie about Mars and Matt Damon. Also a tightrope walking thrill ride, a gay rights drama and a documentary about a 17-year-old activist in our Friday film roundup.

Finally, the magazine National Lampoon was founded by two Harvard students in 1969 and expanded into live shows, a radio show, records and finally, movies. Many of the people we know from SNL cut their teeth at the Lampoon. And even though it’s been gone for two decades, echoes of the magazine and its spin-offs still reverberate through the American comedy scene.

Banner Image: With the New York skyline in the background on clear October day, President Lyndon Baines Johnson sings the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 into law on Liberty Island. Johnson promised Americans that the law would make the United States truer to its values and strengthen the nation. (Photo: Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library)

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Ryan Kailath

Do Gun Laws Target The Right People? 12 MIN, 19 SEC

Every time a mass shooting happens in America, we wonder what can be done to stop it. Can anything be done to identify the kinds of people who commit these mass killings before they happen? Do the laws we have now for background checks and mental health screening make a difference?


Photo: publik16

Guests:
Carolyn Wolf, lawyer
Christian Heyne, Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

The Massive Impact of the 1965 Immigration Act 7 MIN, 54 SEC

Fifty years ago President Lyndon Johnson signed the Immigration Act into law and completely changed who can immigrate to the United States. In 1965, 84% of Americans were white. Today, due largely in part to the Immigration Act, the white population has shrunk to around 60%. And in it’s in cities like Los Angeles that these trends are playing out in a big way. KCRW’s Saul Gonzalez reports.


With the New York skyline in the background on clear October day, President Lyndon Baines Johnson sings the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 into law on Liberty Island. Johnson promised Americans that the law would make the United States truer to its values and strengthen the nation. (Photo: Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library)


Demonstrators at a 2013 immigration march in downtown Los Angeles demanding a path to citizenship for millions of undocumented residents in the United States. While the Immigration Act of 1965 loosened restrictions from many parts of the world, it put in place the first immigration quotas for people from Mexico and other Latin American countries. (Photo: Saul Gonzalez)


Many of America’s current debates about national character and the role of immigrants in our society trace the origins to the Immigration Act. (Photo: Saul Gonzalez)

Guests:
Saul Gonzalez, KCRW producer (@SaulKCRW)

More:
How a 1965 immigration law shaped today's Los Angeles

Film Roundup: 'The Martian' and More 13 MIN, 26 SEC

On Monday, we talked about the reality of water on Mars. Today, we have a movie that includes the idea of water on Mars. And Matt Damon. Also a tightrope walking thrill ride, a gay rights drama and a documentary about a 17-year-old activist in our Friday film roundup.

Guests:
Miri Jedeikin, Movies with Miri (@mirithejedi)
Tim Grierson, Film Critic (@TimGrierson)

'Drunk, Stoned, Brilliant, Dead' Looks at National Lampoon 15 MIN, 5 SEC

Saturday Night Live begins its 41st season this weekend, but there may have never have been an SNL if not for the National Lampoon. The outrageous satire magazine was founded by two Harvard students in 1969 and expanded into live shows, a radio show, records and finally, movies. Many of the people we know from SNL cut their teeth at the Lampoon. And even though it’s been gone for two decades, echoes of the magazine and its spin-offs still reverberate through the American comedy scene.

Guests:
Al Jean, showrunner, 'The Simpsons' (@AlJean)
Janis Hirsch, National Lampoon
Douglas Tirola, director, 'Drunk, Stoned, Brilliant, Dead' (@DouglasTirola)

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