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FROM THIS EPISODE

In a foreign policy speech Monday, Donald Trump proposed significant changes to the US immigration system, including an ideological questionnaire for Muslim immigrants and visitors to the US.

Also, when a deluge of Central Americans seeking asylum in the US kicked off in 2014, authorities quickly came under pressure to do something with all those people. Enter the Corrections Corporation of America, the largest private, for-profit prison company in the US, which scored a billion-dollar, no-bid contract to construct an enormous facility near the border.

Next, after twenty-two years away, the Rams are back in Los Angeles. HBO’s “Hard Knocks” gives fans an all-access pass to training camp, as the team begins to adapt to its new home.

Then, depending on whom you ask, billionaire mega-farmers Lynda and Stewart Resnick are either two of the most philanthropically-minded people in California, or the state’s most rapacious water-users – or both.

And finally, Japan’s obsession with Los Angeles, circa 1976, is back.

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Trump proposes ideological test for immigrants 9 MIN, 34 SEC

Presidential candidate Donald Trump gave a foreign policy speech in Ohio Monday after a rocky period of missteps, including the back and forth with the father of a slain Muslim soldier, accusing President Obama of founding ISIS, and recent reports that Trump’s campaign manager received millions in cash from pro-Russia Ukrainian interests a few years back. Trump was on message Monday though, when he called for an end to nation building and stressed a need to redefine who America’s allies are in this era of global terrorism. He also proposed significant changes to the immigration system, including an ideological questionnaire for Muslim immigrants and visitors to the US.

Guests:
Doris Meissner, Migration Policy Institute (@MigrationPolicy)

Inside the no-bid deal to detain Central American asylum seekers 6 MIN, 21 SEC

Between July 2015 and June 2016, more than sixty-six thousand parents and children came across the US border from Central America to escape violence in their home countries. Many of those families were detained at the border and when the deluge of asylum-seekers kicked off in 2014, authorities quickly came under pressure to do something with all those people. Enter the Corrections Corporation of America, the largest private, for-profit prison company in the US. The CCA scored a billion-dollar contract to construct an enormous facility for women and children near the border, and that deal is coming under new scrutiny now.

Guests:
Chico Harlan, Reporter (@chicoharlan)

Where does the first couple of Cali Ag get all its water? 13 MIN, 51 SEC

Depending on whom you ask, billionaire mega-farmers Lynda and Stewart Resnick are either sinners or saints. They are either two of the most progressive, philanthropically minded people in California, or they’re rapacious users of the state’s limited water supply who have used their political influence to collect more water for their crops than is used by every home in the entire city of Los Angeles. Or perhaps the Resnicks are all of the above.

Guests:
Josh Harkinson, Mother Jones magazine (@JoshHarkinson)

'Hard Knocks:' Behind the scenes at LA Rams' training camp 8 MIN, 49 SEC

After twenty-two years away, the Rams are back in LA. They beat the Dallas Cowboys at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Saturday and will take on the Kansas City Chiefs at home next. The LA Rams have been training at U.C. Irvine. And fans have an all-access pass to training camp thanks to HBO’s “Hard Knocks”, a behind-the-scenes documentary series that follows just one team each season. This year, it's the Rams, and it’s high drama as the team adapts to their new home.

Guests:
Matthew Dissenger, Director, Producer for NFL Films (@mdiss_nflfilms)

Japan's obsession with LA, circa 1976, is back 7 MIN, 33 SEC

When it comes to fashion, art, and design, Tokyo has become one of the world’s trendsetters. But for a moment in 1976, Los Angeles was Tokyo’s muse. That was thanks to a Japanese pop culture and fashion magazine called “Popeye.” For its first issue, the editors put out a glossy anthropological survey of Los Angeles life, mainly youth culture: skateboarding, surfing and a lot of UCLA gear. That issue became a cultural sensation, and formed an idealized vision of LA in the minds of millions of Japanese people. It’s been 40 years, but that issue is back on newsstands after the publisher chose to reprint it, and again, it’s a sensation in Tokyo.

Guests:
Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times (@JulieMakLAT)

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