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A massive report released Wednesday after a seven year inquiry sharply criticized former British Prime Minister Tony Blair for leading Britain into the Iraq War. Could the findings lead to legal action against Blair and members of his administration? Also, following the report, Blair maintained that Iraq is better off now without Saddam Hussein. But five years after the U.S. withdrawal, the country is still at war and more than 250 people were killed in a recent ISIS suicide bombing. What’s going on inside Iraq and what is the current U.S. policy there? Then, we remember Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, whose more than 40 films and documentaries were described as “contemplative” and “poetic.” Next, since 2011, journalist Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to Palestinian communities to report on confrontations with Israeli troops and the often harsh realities of Palestinian lives. The result is a new book called “The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine.” And finally, LA Metro is launching its new bike-share program Thursday. Will it be affordable enough for low-income riders?

Banner Image: Former British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, delivers a speech following the publication of The Iraq Inquiry Report by John Chilcot, in London, Britain July 6, 2016. REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Long-awaited Report Slams Blair for British Involvement in Iraq 9 MIN, 18 SEC

A massive report released Wednesday after a seven-year-long inquiry slammed former British Prime Minister Tony Blair for leading Britain into the Iraq War. The Chilcot report sharply criticized Britain’s political and military leaders, and Blair in particular, for taking the country into a war that was “avoidable,” and ended “a very long way from success.” What was Blair’s reaction to the 2.6 million-word assessment? Could the findings lead to legal action against the former Prime Minister and members of his administration?

Guests:
Griff Witte, Washington Post (@griffwitte)

More:
Scathing report on Blair's Iraq War role prompts contrition, defiance and a reckoning

Better Off Without Saddam? An Iraq Update 8 MIN, 44 SEC

Following a scathing report on Britain’s involvement in Iraq, former Prime Minister Tony Blair maintained that Iraq is better off now without Saddam Hussein. But five years after the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, the country is still at war. More than 250 people were killed in Baghdad Sunday in a suicide bombing. ISIS claimed responsibility. What’s going on inside Iraq and what is the current U.S. policy there?

Guests:
Borzou Daragahi, BuzzFeed News (@borzou)

More:
Negligence May Have Killed More People Than ISIS In Baghdad Blast

The Poetic Life and Films of Iranian Filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami 8 MIN, 55 SEC

Remembrances are pouring out for the Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami who died on Monday at the age of 76. He was undergoing treatment for cancer in Paris. Kiarostami made more than 40 films and documentaries. Words like “intimate,” “contemplative” and “poetic” have been used to describe his work. His films were not overtly political, though he had his run-ins with conservatives at home in Iran. After “Taste of Cherry” won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1997, there were protests at the airport in Tehran because of Kiarostami’s association with outsiders.

Guests:
Roya Rastegar, LA Film Festival

More:
LA Film Festival
Director Abbas Kiarostami Balanced Realism and Poetry, Censors and Viewers

'The Way to the Spring': Life and Death in a Palestinian Village 15 MIN, 19 SEC

A 17-year-old Palestinian boy broke into a West Bank settlement last week and stabbed a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl to death while she slept. It’s the latest in an ongoing wave of violence around West Bank settlements that has resulted in the deaths of 33 Israelis and more than 200 Palestinians in the last nine months. More than half a million people now live in Israeli settlements in the West Bank. One of those settlements, Halamish, sits right next to the small Palestinian village of Nabi Saleh. Since 2011, author and journalist Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to Nabi Saleh, and other Palestinian communities, to report on their protests, their confrontations with Israeli troops, and the often harsh realities of their lives. The result is a new book called “The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine.”

Guests:
Ben Ehrenreich, Journalist and Author

The Way to the Spring

Ben Ehrenreich

Is LA's New Bike-Share Affordable Enough for Low-Income Riders? 6 MIN, 6 SEC

LA Metro is launching its bike-share program Thursday. One thousand bikes will be available from 65 hubs all over downtown Los Angeles, from Union Station to Little Tokyo to the Arts District. This is the latest in local bike-share programs; West Hollywood, Santa Monica and Long Beach have programs of their own. But Metro is trying to do something different by reaching out to low-income communities. Will LA’s new bike-share program be affordable enough for low-income riders?

Guests:
Tamika Butler, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition

More:
bike-share info
Multicultural Communities for Mobility
The Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition

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