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FROM THIS EPISODE

We start with a two-part look at the shooting deaths of 12 people in the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo. First, an update on what we know about the incident and the manhunt for the shooters. Then, a history of the paper and its controversies over the year. Next, how did the U.S. federal government become the nation’s largest creditor? After that, author Claude Knobler talks about his new book, a memoir about adopting a son from Ethiopia and how the experience changed his approach as a parent. And finally, in our regular parenting segment, the challenges of limiting children’s screen time and the legalities of spanking.

Banner Image: People hold placards with pictures of victims which read "I am Charlie", to pay tribute to victims in front of the Brandenburg Gate near the French embassy at Pariser Platz in Berlin January 7, 2015, following a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris. Hooded gunmen stormed on Wednesday the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo (Charlie Weekly) a weekly satirical magazine known for lampooning radical Islam, killing at least 12 people, including two police officers in the worst militant attack on French soil in recent decades. A police union official said the assailants remained at liberty and there were fears of further attacks. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Producers:
Andrew Walsh
Christian Bordal
Matt Holzman
Jolie Myers
Anna Scott

Paris Shooting Update 8 MIN, 27 SEC

Earlier today, three gunmen attacked the offices of the satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo. French President François Hollande has called the attack an act of terrorism and an assault on freedom of the press; we hear the latest news from the ground in Paris.

Guests:
Dana Lewis, Journalist with Al Jazeera America (@danaslewis)

More:
Hunt for gunmen after 12 killed in Paris attack on satirical magazine

A History of Charlie Hebdo 8 MIN, 19 SEC

Charlie Hebdo has a long history of courting controversy. It’s managed to offend just about everyone during its nearly 45-year existence. The magazine’s first iteration, called Hiri Kiri, was banned in 1970 after it mocked the death of French President Charles de Gaulle. We discuss the history of the magazine and its place in French society.

Guests:
Ruth Bender, Paris reporter for the Wall Street Journal. (@ruthbenderparis)

Bank of America, Literally 9 MIN, 4 SEC

It was adventure on the high seas: Four ships had gone off-course in the Gulf of Mexico and on the Eastern Seaboard. Government officials were hot on their trail, but not because of any danger or crime. The U.S. marshals on the case were essentially acting as repo men, tracking the ships because their owners had defaulted on a government loan. In fact, the federal government is the biggest creditor in the country; how did that happen? And why isn’t there anyone in charge of the literal Bank of America?

Guests:
Michael Grunwald, Politico magazine (@MikeGrunwald)

More:
The (Real) Bank of America By MICHAEL GRUNWALD

More Love, Less Panic 13 MIN, 43 SEC

Parenting: It’s not just for parents anymore. We live in a time when the ins and outs of child-rearing have become a cultural obsession: Even those without kids can’t escape the conversation. But author Claude Knobler thinks we should all back off. He talks about his new book, which lays out his theory.

Guests:
Claude Knobler, Author of “More Love, Less Panic: 7 Lessons I Learned About Life, Love, and Parenting After We Adopted Our Son from Ethiopia.”

More Love, Less Panic

Claude Knobler

Kids and Their Screens 8 MIN, 5 SEC

Let’s face it, parents: We’re often well-meaning hypocrites. We’re on our electronic devices 24/7, but we freak out when our kids spend hours on screens. There’s official advice out there that says we need to limit their screen time, but how much? And are limits worth the home strife? That and more in our regular parenting segment.

Guests:
Stefanie Wilder Taylor, Co-Host of the parenting podcast “For Crying Out Loud” and author of the book “Naptime is the New Happy Hour.” (@swildertaylor)

Sippy Cups Are Not for Chardonnay

Stefanie Wilder-Taylor

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