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FROM THIS EPISODE

We start with a look at Robert Durst’s shocking turn on HBO’s The Jinx last night. Did it amount to a murder confession? Also, when do documentary filmmakers have a moral obligation to share information with law enforcement? Then, in our weekly television roundup, an update from the South by Southwest festival in Austin this week, where new shows are premiering. Next, writer and comedian Issa Rae talks about being “black and awkward” and how she turned that into a brand. And finally, why are the number of deaths by accidental drug overdose increasing among older Americans?

Banner Image: Real estate heir Robert Durst appears in a New York criminal courtroom on December 10, 2014, for his trial on charges of trespassing on property owned by his estranged family. Durst agreed on March 16, 2015 to be extradited to Los Angeles County from New Orleans to face a charge of first-degree murder in the 2000 death of a longtime friend. Durst, who is the subject of a six-part HBO documentary series called The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, has maintained his innocence. The 71-year-old was arrested on Saturday in New Orleans. The warrant issued by Los Angeles County is for the death of Susan Berman, whose body was discovered in her West Los Angeles home on Christmas Eve in 2000, authorities said. Picture taken December 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Producers:
Jolie Myers
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Christian Bordal

Robert Durst and the Death of Susan Berman 8 MIN, 37 SEC

Real estate heir and suspected murderer Robert Durst agreed to waive extradition to Los Angeles today after being arrested in New Orleans over the weekend for the murder of Susan Berman 15 years ago. The arrest came after a shocking turn on Sunday’s finale to the HBO six-part documentary series The Jinx, which featured Durst’s first-ever interviews. In last night’s episode, Jinx director Andrew Jarecki confronted Durst with a piece of incriminating new evidence that appears to link Durst to the murder of Susan Berman in Los Angeles 15 years ago. Then, Durst went to use the bathroom, not realizing his microphone was still on, and muttered to himself what sounded like a confession. We revisit Berman’s death with a writer who researched it extensively.

Guests:
Cathy Scott, author, 'Murder in Beverly Hills' (@CathyScott)

Joe Berlinger, Filmmaker Behind 'Paradise Lost' Series, Weighs in on 'The Jinx' 10 MIN, 4 SEC

Robert Durst’s unwitting, apparent confession on Sunday’s episode of The Jinx turned the documentarians into sudden participants in a real-life case. What do we know about when they started to cooperate with law enforcement? Also, what are the moral considerations for investigative journalists when reporting uncovers new evidence? We talk to one documentarian who’s been in a similar situation.

Guests:
Joe Berlinger, documentary filmmaker (@joeberlinger)

TV Roundup: Beyond 'The Jinx' 7 MIN, 27 SEC

The Jinx is obviously the biggest topic in TV today, but there’s a lot more going on in the land of the small screen. There are new shows premiering this week on television and at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, including the new season of Community in its new home on Yahoo. The interactive part of South by Southwest kicked off Friday -- and these days “interactive” includes online content and streaming as well as TV. We catch up on it all in our weekly television roundup.

Guests:
Michael Schneider, Indiewire / Variety (@Franklinavenue)

Issa Rae on Being “Black and Awkward” 14 MIN, 30 SEC

When a friend called Issa Rae "black and awkward” and told her those were the worst things that a person could be, it stung a little. But then, she decided to own it. Issa Rae has since parlayed her personal brand into a popular web series, a pilot development deal with HBO, and a new memoir. We hear from Rae on her unlikely success.

Guests:
Issa Rae, author, 'The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl' (@IssaRae)

Accidental Overdoses Increasing Among Baby Boomers 5 MIN, 26 SEC

Drug use and accidental overdoses are usually associated with the young and irresponsible. But not anymore. Baby boomers are now more likely to die of an accidental overdose than young people. Drug-related hospital stays and emergency room visits are also way up for people over the age of 50. Now, drug rehab programs are trying to figure out how they’re going to handle the almost 6 million boomers that will need treatment by 2020.

Guests:
Zusha Elinson, Wall Street Journal (@ZushaElinson)

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