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FROM THIS EPISODE

Donald Trump talks immigration in Arizona. But first, he makes a pit stop in Mexico to meet privately with President Peña Nieto. Both are very unpopular in Mexico at the moment. So why would Peña Nieto welcome Trump to Mexico now?

Sheriff Joe Arpaio will be part of the Arizona welcoming committee when Trump arrives in the state. Arpaio is currently under investigation for racial profiling and contempt. How might his support for Trump play into the presidential campaign?

Then, bills headed to Gov. Brown’s desk could affect two groups of California workers who aren’t now entitled to regular overtime pay - farm workers and domestic workers. Why haven’t those workers been paid overtime?

Next, some students who participate in pro-Palestinian groups on college campuses have found themselves the target of harassment. Press Play speaks with a UCLA student who found his name on a poster labeling him a “Jew Hater.”

And finally, the Upright Citizens Brigade has promoted the idea of improv as self-improvement, something for everyone, and the phrase “yes, and,” is now ubiquitous. But UCB has also been criticized for having a corporate and even cult-like environment.


Photo courtesy of Tim Duffy

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Why did Peña Nieto invite Trump to Mexico? 8 MIN, 45 SEC

Donald Trump will clarify his immigration policies in a speech in Arizona Wednesday; but first, he’ll make a pit stop in Mexico City to meet privately with Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto. The Republican presidential candidate is very unpopular in Mexico; but so is Peña Nieto, whose approval rating hit a record low of 23 percent this month. Peña Nieto once compared Trump to Hitler, so why would he welcome him to Mexico now?  

Guests:
Shannon O'Neil, Council on Foreign Relations (@shannonkoneil)

Sheriff Joe Arpaio, under scrutiny for racial profiling, welcomes Trump to Arizona 6 MIN, 31 SEC

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio will be part of the Arizona welcoming committee when Donald Trump heads to Phoenix for an immigration speech Wednesday. Arpaio, a notorious anti-immigration hardliner, easily won a primary battle Tuesday, but his Democratic rival is polling ahead when it comes to the general election in November. Arpaio’s been on the job for 23 years and he’s been at the center of the immigration debate in Arizona since the early 2000s. However, for the last eight years, he’s been under investigation for racial profiling. The Justice Department is considering whether to bring Arpaio up on criminal contempt and perjury charges for ignoring court orders to stop targeting Latinos in his county. How might Arpaio’s support of Trump play into the presidential campaign?

Guests:
Rebekah Sanders, Reporter (@RebekahLSanders)

Why don’t California farm workers or domestic workers get overtime pay? 7 MIN, 40 SEC

Bills are headed to Governor Brown’s desk for his signature that could affect two groups of California workers who aren’t now entitled to regular overtime pay. One would make overtime kick in for farm workers after eight hours of work in a day, rather than 10. The other would make a temporary overtime law permanent, guaranteeing domestic workers overtime pay if they work nine hours in one day and 45 hours per week. Most hourly workers get overtime after eight hours. So why have these two groups been excluded?

Guests:
Veronica Wilson, Director

More:
UCLA Labor Center

Israeli-Palestinian conflict on California college campuses 16 MIN, 43 SEC

According to Pew Research polling, far more Americans sympathize with Israel than with Palestinians. Young people, however, are far more likely to take the Palestinians’ side. In recent polling, a quarter said they don’t side with Israel, compared to just 10 percent a decade ago. As classes begin again, you can see that shift playing out on college campuses. Students are joining the BDS movement – Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions – and groups like Students for Justice in Palestine. Their participation in those groups has made some students the target of harassment. Press Play spoke with a UCLA student who found his name on a poster labeling him a “Jew Hater.”

Guests:
Steven M. Cohen, Professor, Sociologist
Robert Gardner, Student
David Brog, Director

The rise of improv and the mainstreaming of ‘yes, and’ 7 MIN, 57 SEC

When a Press Play producer pitches a story idea that doesn’t make the cut, the staff jokingly says, “yes and.” The phrase, of course, comes from improv. In improv comedy, when someone throws an idea at you, no matter how bad, during a scene, you’re supposed to just go with it say, “yes and.” The fact that this is known outside the world of comedy clubs tells you how mainstream improv has become. The key organization behind that ubiquity is the improv empire known as the Upright Citizens Brigade, which holds classes in New York and LA and attracts tens of thousands of students a year, raking in millions of dollars. UCB has also promoted the idea of improv as self-improvement: something for everyone, not just wannabe actors. But it has also been criticized for a corporate and even cult-like environment.

Guests:
Emma Allen, Writer (@emmaEWallen)

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