ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Nine people were shot to death last night during prayer at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina. A young, white suspect has been arrested. He's reported as saying he wanted to kill black people. We hear how the victims are being remembered and get President Obama's reaction.

Also, Pope Francis is blaming global warming on human activity and lambasting political leaders for looking the other way. His authority is already being challenged by climate change skeptics here in the US.

Photo: People gather outside Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church after the street was re-opened a day after a mass shooting left nine dead during a bible study at the church in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Andrea Brody
Sarah Sweeney

Charleston Grapples with Mass Killing at Historic Church 22 MIN, 7 SEC

Just 14 hours after nine people were killed during prayer service a historic black church in South Carolina, 21-year old Dylann Storm Roof was arrested at a traffic stop 200 miles away in the town of Shelby, North Carolina. He's reported as saying he wanted to kill black people. Charleston Police Chief Gregory Mullen voiced appreciation for "all the people who came together during a very tragic situation, a horrific situation. And one that has touched the heart and soul of every person who lives in this community." The federal government has opened a hate-crime investigation. We hear how the victims are being remembered and get President Obama's reaction.

 

 

Guests:
Glenn Smith, Post and Courier (@glennsmith5)
Walter Rhett, historian and writer (@walterrhett)
Jamil Smith, MTV News (@JamilSmith)

More:
Post and Courier editorial: Unite against inhumanity of church atrocity
New Republic on the life of Denmark Vesey, co-founder of Charleston's Emanuel Church

Pope's Urgent Call for Action on Climate Change 27 MIN, 23 SEC

In September, Pope Francis is scheduled to meet with President Obama and make an address to Congress. Today, he issued an encyclical on climate change — posing direct challenges to world leaders who've failed to take "urgent" action. "Laudato Si, On the Care of the Common Home," is expected to be influential beyond the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics.

Guests:
Joshua McElwee, National Catholic Reporter (@joshjmac)
Pablo Canziani, National Scientific and Technical Research Council (Argentina) (@conicetdialoga)
Stephen Moore, Heritage Foundation (@StephenMoore)
Jessie Dye, Earth Ministry (@EarthMinistry)

More:
McElwee on Pope Francis' urgent call for the world to curb climate change
Moore on the Pope's misguided policies

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED