ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

This week's arrest of a 14-year-old Muslim student whose home-made clock was mistaken for some kind of bomb raised the issue of Islamaphobia in America. Now it's become an issue in the presidential campaign. 

Also, the US and Russia hold military talks on Syria. On today's Talking Point, the science of living for 200 years. 

Photo: Ahmed Mohamed addresses the press on September 17, 2015

Producers:
Jenny Hamel
Paul von Zielbauer
Evan George

US and Russia Hold Military Talks on Syria 6 MIN, 30 SEC

The defense chiefs of the US and Russia today held their first direct conversations in more than a year. The subject was Syria.  Andrew Weiss is vice president of the Carnegie Endowment, where he oversees research on Russia and Eurasia.  

Guests:
Andrew S. Weiss, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (@andrewsweiss)

From High School to the Campaign Trail: Islamophobia in America 34 MIN, 7 SEC

Social media exploded this week when a Muslim-American kid who brought a home-made clock to school was arrested on suspicion of building a bomb. Ahmed Mohamed was interrogated by five police officers, handcuffed, arrested and taken away. The hashtag I Stand with Ahmed went viral, and the 14-year old was invited to Silicon Valley, MIT and the White House.

But Muslim-Americans say it's nothing new, and yesterday Donald Trump failed to repudiate a questioner who called Muslims America's "problem." Fourteen years after September 11, are Muslim citizens still the victims of an "us versus them" mentality that's all too familiar?

Guests:
Wayne Slater, journalist and author (@WayneSlater)
Moustafa Bayoumi, Brookyn College (@BayoumiMoustafa)
Karam Dana, University of Washington Bothell (@karamdana)

More:
TtP on the Texas Mohammad cartoon attack
Associated Press series on NYPD investigation of Muslim community
Bayoumi's 'How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America'
Trump's response to 'the problem in this country,' Obama
Clinton on Trump not challenging anti-Muslim questioner

This Muslim American Life

Moustafa Bayoumi

The Secrets to Living for 200 Years 9 MIN, 15 SEC

Death is no doubt inevitable. But is aging necessary? Maybe not.


Inuit woman and child standing on bowhead whale
Photo by Ansgar Walk

Alaska's Inuit hunters know that bowhead whales live twice as long as humans -- sometimes up to 200 years. Other creatures also have much longer lives than we do. Now scientists are trying to find out why. David Robson writes about medicine and technology for the BBC’s science website, BBC Future.

Guests:
David Robson, BBC (@d_a_robson)

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED