ON AIR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Photo by KevinLamarque/Reuters

Why is North Korea threatening Guam? 6 MIN, 32 SEC

The latest threat from North Korea includes precise details, including the intended trajectory, of four missiles. They're said to be aimed at the waters near America's territory of Guam -- to teach President Trump a lesson. Ankit Panda, senior editor at The Diplomat, which covers the Asia-Pacific Region, says Kim is daring the US and Japan to shoot the missiles down, to afford him information on how the two countries would respond.

Guests:
Ankit Panda, The Diplomat (@nktpnd)

Diversity in higher education is back in the crosshairs 34 MIN, 42 SEC

Despite decades of legal actions, legislation, and US Supreme Court decisions, "affirmative action" in college admissions is still a political hot potato. The New York Times reports that the Trump Administration is recruiting from among its political appointees to the Justice Department's Civil Rights division for lawyers who want to bring challenges to race-based policies in university and college admissions. Critics fear that will weaken protections for blacks and Latinos. Caught in the middle is the fastest-growing minority, Asian-Americans. Is the Administration aiming for real change — or signaling to its base of supporters? Is the real enemy of "diversity" not race after all--but economic inequality?

Guests:
Alia Wong, Atlantic magazine (@aliaemily)
Ilya Shapiro, Cato Institute (@ishapiro)
Christine Emba, Washington Post (@ChristineEmba)
Peter Schmidt, Senior Writer, Chronicle of Higher Education (@pschmidtchron)

More:
Students for Fair Admissions v. Fellows of Harvard College
Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina
Wong on the complicated history of affirmative action
Wong on the thorny relationship between Asians and affirmative action
Shapiro on Sessions DOJ going after affirmative action's institutional racism
Emba on rich people, not blacks, keeping white Americans out of college
Schmidt on colleges' exaggerated fear over Trump's attacks on race in admissions

Color and Money

Peter G. Schmidt

CEOs and military use sci-fi writers to predict future 8 MIN, 23 SEC

Writers of science fiction imagine the future, and while some undoubtedly hit it big, it's not a get-rich profession. That may be changing. In the New Yorker magazine, Nick Romeo reports on a company called SciFutures — which churns out scenarios, good and bad, for corporations—and the military.

Guests:
Nick Romeo, author, journalist and cultural critic

More:
Ari Popper's TED Talk on leveraging science fiction for radical change

Subscribe to the 5 Things To Do newsletter

Never miss the best of what to do with your free time.

 

More From To the Point

LATEST BLOG POSTS

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED