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Photo: A CBP Border Patrol agent conducts a pat down of a female Mexican being placed in a holding facility. (Gerald L. Nino, CBP, US Department of Homeland Security)

Arizona seeks to quell protests 6 MIN, 32 SEC

Last night in Arkansas, cries of "Do your job!  Do your job!  Do your job" greeted US Senator Tom Cotton, the latest Republican to have a town hall disrupted by protesters.  In Arizona no such disruption has taken place, but the state legislature is re-defining a law aimed at organized crime to apply to protests… just in case.  Howard Fischer of Capitol Media Services reports that the new racketeering legislation mean that protestors would not only could prosecuted, but could also have their assets seized.

Guests:
Howard Fischer, Capitol Media Services (@azcapmedia)

Will immigrant round-ups make America safer? 33 MIN, 7 SEC

President Trump has given enforcement agents new authority to arrest almost any undocumented immigrant — even if they're working and paying taxes. Critics say that's a license to pick the "low-hanging fruit," rather than doing the hard work of finding drug dealers and gang members who really are dangerous. Agents themselves say they've been freed from various limits imposed by the Obama Administration, so they're finally able to do their jobs. We hear about that argument, the likely crowding of courts and detention centers and the climate of fear in immigrant communities.

More:
Tillerson-Kelly on bilateral discussions in Mexico City

Enrique's Journey

Sonia Nazario

An old drug gets a ridiculously high price….again 10 MIN, 1 SEC

Are incentives for so-called "orphan drugs" being misused to jack up the price of one medication by 4000 percent?


Photo by Chris Potter

A rare form of muscular dystrophy has long been treated in the US by a steroid imported from overseas at a price of $1200 a year. Now the FDA has approved its manufacture and distribution in this country by the drug company Marathon. The new price is $89,000 a year — reduced to $54,000 after rebates and discounts. We get perspective from Carolyn Johnson, who covers the business of medicine for the Washington Post, and Dr. Aaron Kesselheim, a professor of medicine at Harvard, where he's also Director of the program on Regulation, Therapeutics and Law.

Guests:
Carolyn Y. Johnson, Washington Post (@Carolynyjohnson)
Aaron Kesselheim, Harvard Medical School (@akesselheim)

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