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FROM THIS EPISODE

The climate change summit in Copenhagen six years ago was over-hyped and finally perceived as a failure. So, as almost 150 heads of state converge on Paris today, there's an effort to manage expectations. But despite many obstacles to international action, the sense of urgency is greater than ever.

Later on the program, the Islamic State may face defeat in Iraq and Syria. Could it retreat to a new headquarters across the Mediterranean Sea in the failed state of Libya?

Photo: Tafe Sa Tonsley

Producers:
Jenny Hamel
Katie Cooper
Evan George

Colorado Springs Grieving over Planned Parenthood Shooting 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Three days after Friday’s deadly assault on a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs, police have arrested the likely killer, but haven’t announced any motive. Planned Parenthood calls it "terrorism." Colorado Pubic Radio's Megan Verlee updates the story.

Guests:
Megan Verlee, Colorado Public Radio (@CPRVerlee)

Will the Latest Climate Talks Start Something New? 34 MIN, 4 SEC

The first Earth Summit was held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. It was agreed that human interference was changing the climate and that something had to be done. Since then, conferences have been held all over the world--most notably in Kyoto in 1997 and Copenhagen in 2009 — without producing an enforceable strategy to cope with changes that are already under way or to prevent more change in the future. Now the leaders of nations covering 95% of the planet are convening in Paris to try again. Can even that limited goal survive differences between rich and developing nations and overcome domestic politics in the US and other countries?

Guests:
David Unger, Christian Science Monitor (@dungerdunger)
Michael Mann, Pennsylvania State University (@MichaelEMann)
Thilmeeza Hussain, Voice of Women / Climate Wise Women (@thilmeeza)
Suzanne Goldenberg, Guardian newspaper (@suzyji)

More:
Unger on hopes that Paris climate summit can succeed where past efforts have fallen short
Goldenberg Paris 'climate circus'

ISIS Has a Fallback Plan 8 MIN, 55 SEC

The Islamic State may face defeat in Iraq and Syria, but that doesn't mean it will have no place to go. ISIS raised its black flag over the Libyan city of Surt almost a year ago. Now, Surt is "an actively managed colony of the central Islamic State," and could be a fallback option if ISIS is pushed out of Raqqa, its current headquarters in Syria. That's according to David Kirkpatrick, a veteran Middle East correspondent for the New York Times.


Photo: Day Donaldson

Guests:
David D. Kirkpatrick, New York Times (@ddknyt)

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