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FROM THIS EPISODE

For months, Republicans have kept up a drumbeat of verbal attacks on Planned Parenthood. Last week, three people were killed at a clinic in Colorado Springs. Some abortion rights advocates say extreme political rhetoric was responsible for deadly violence. We  take a look at that accusation.

Later on the program, will a billionaire in a hoodie change attitudes about paternity leave? 

Photo: American Life League

Producers:
Paul von Zielbauer
Christine Detz
Katie Cooper

Congress Reaches Agreement on Transportation Funding 6 MIN, 30 SEC

America's transportation infrastructure is in decline, and Congress hasn't renewed long-term funding for ten years. Now, for the first time since 2005, conferees for the House and the Senate have reached an agreement. Reid Wilson, Congress editor and political correspondent for the Morning Consult, a newsletter focused on Capitol Hill, has more on the story.

Guests:
Reid Wilson, The Hill (@PoliticsReid)

Political Speech and Violent Action 34 MIN

Robert Dear is accused of shooting up a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs last week, killing a police officer along with two other people and injuring six more. No clear motive has been identified, but Dear reportedly said something about “no more baby parts” when he was arrested. The attack has been denounced -- even by groups opposed to abortion, but Planned Parenthood and other abortion defenders insist it was only a matter of time before inflammatory rhetoric resulted in violence. They complain -- not just about direct threats that mandate security at abortion clinics -- but also the cause-and-effect of public comments by Republican politicians. Does rhetoric really affect reality? Are there limits to free speech in the midst of hard-fought political warfare?

Guests:
Laura Chapin, LKC Consulting (@LauraChapin)
Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist (@MZHemingway)
Rosa Eberly, Pennsylvania State University (@PSUCAS)
John Nichols, The Nation (@NicholsUprising)

Uprising

John Nichols

Will Paternity Leave Go Mainstream? 8 MIN, 53 SEC

The idea that new fathers should be given time off to bond with their babies has been gaining steam with US employers. Now Facebook founder Mark Zukerberg may be giving it new momentum.

“Studies show that when working parents take time to be with their newborns, outcomes are better for the children and families.” Those are the words of billionaire Mark Zuckerberg, announcing that he’s taking two months off from his work at Facebook. All other new parents at his company will be paid to take four months off. Emily Peck has been writing about paternity leave for the Huffington Post.

Guests:
Emily Peck, Huffington Post (@EmilyRPeck)

More:
NY Times on how Zukerberg's example helps fight stigma of family leave

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