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Photo: President Donald Trump speaks during an interview in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)

Two Oval Office conversations: One big mess for the White House 42 MIN, 1 SEC

President Trump delivered today's commencement speech to the Coast Guard Academy in Connecticut. As he praised the accomplishments of the graduates, he listed some of his own… and made reference to reports that he leaked intelligence to the Russians and tried to shut down an FBI Investigation into his associates. "You will find things happen to you that you do not deserve and are not warranted, but you have to put your head down and fight! Things will work out just fine. Just look at the way I have been treated lately."

But many Republicans say they're concerned about Trump's leak of intelligence to the Russians and his alleged effort to shut down an FBI investigation of his associates. Even White House staff members are reportedly fighting among themselves over unpredictable behavior that leaves them contradicting their boss and each other. For the first time on the House floor, a Democrat today called for impeachment. We update the President's troubles as he prepares for his first trip overseas.

After we recorded our discussion, Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller to serve as Special Counsel to oversee the previously-confirmed FBI investigation of Russian government efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election and related matters.

Guests:
Glenn Thrush, New York Times (@GlennThrush)
Matthew Miller, Vianovo (@matthewamiller)
Evan McMullin, Stand Up Republic (@Evan_McMullin)
Thomas Wright, Brookings Institution (@thomaswright08)

More:
Thrush on flaring tempers, confusion at Trump White House

FCC to vote on rolling back net neutrality regulations 8 MIN, 17 SEC


Photo by Backbone Campaign

Currently, broadband transmission is classified as a "common carrier"—subject to government oversight. Tomorrow, the Federal Communications Commission is scheduled to begin the process of letting phone and cable companies police themselves. That would mean the end of what's called "net neutrality." Craig Aaron, president and CEO of Free Press, an independent group that advocates for press freedom, diversity in media and supporting net neutrality, considers what the vote could mean to consumers.

Guests:
Craig Aaron, Free Press (@freepress)

More:
John Oliver on net neutrality
Go FCC yourself

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