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FROM THIS EPISODE

Hillary Clinton’s been cleared of criminal wrongdoing in her use of email servers while Secretary of State, but that doesn’t mean Republicans -- or voters -- will let her off the hook. How the “extremely careless” charge could dog Clinton until November, coming up.

Later, 2 years ago Congress passed a law to speed up veteran’s access to medical care -- but the problems persist. How to overhaul the 10 billion dollar program at the VA.

Photo: Gage Skidmore

Police Shooting of Philando Castile Livestreamed to Facebook 6 MIN, 30 SEC

We’re learning more details today about yet another fatal police shooting of a black man. Last night, a police officer fatally shot Philando Castile, during a traffic stop in a suburb of St. Paul. His girlfriend recorded the bloody aftermath of the shooting from the front seat on her cell phone, and live-streamed it to Facebook.

Guests:
Mark Zdechlik, Minnesota Public Radio (@MarkZdechlik)

More:
MPR coverage on the Falcon Heights shooting

Is Clinton's Absolution Republican Ammunition? 32 MIN, 42 SEC

The FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton’s handling of classified emails while Secretary of State officially ended Tuesday, but the aftershocks for the presumptive Democratic candidate continue. FBI Director James Comey cleared Clinton of criminal wrongdoing, but he also handed the Trump campaign a ready-made attack ad by scolding Clinton and her staff for handling sensitive information with “extreme carelessness.” Today Comey went before lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

Guests:
Stan Greenberg, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research (@StanGreenberg)
Karoli Kuns, Crooks and Liars (@Karoli)
Heidi Kitrosser, University of Minnesota (@HeidiKitrosser)
Ana Kasparian, 'The Young Turks' (@AnaKasparian)
David French, National Review / National Review Institute (@DavidAFrench)

More:
The New York Times says FBI testimony is a ready-made ad for Donald Trump
French says Comey did not follow the law
Kuns on why she supports Hillary after hating her

The VA and an Epidemic of Veteran Suicides 9 MIN, 44 SEC

It’s been two years since the scandal first broke about overlong wait-times for veterans seeking medical care -- but the billions spent didn’t fix the problem and in some instances may have made things worse -- that’s according to a new federal report. The findings coincide with another new study that confirms a disturbing statistic often cited about veterans mental health -- roughly 20 veterans commit suicide every day.

Photo: Kathy Swendiman

Guests:
Patricia Kime, Military Times (@PatriciaKime)

More:
Kime on new VA study finding 20 veterans commit suicide daily

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