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FROM THIS EPISODE

Three weeks of unusually public drama revealed that the Roman Catholic hierarchy is sharply divided between traditionalists and reformers. Pope Francis called the meeting, asking how to reach out to gays and lesbians and to Catholics who divorce and re-marry. Now he alone, can decide what's next.

Later in the program, science, superstition and GMO's. 

Producers:
Christine Detz
Sarah Sweeney
Gideon Brower

WHO Says Processed Meat, Red Meat Are a Cancer Hazard 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Bacon, sausage and other processed meats cause cancer. Red meat probably does too. That's according to a research division of the World Health Organization in a conclusion announced today after reviewing decades of research. Peter Whoriskey, who reports for the Washington Post, has more.

Guests:
Peter Whoriskey, Washington Post (@PeterWhoriskey)

Pope Francis and the Soul of the Church 34 MIN, 17 SEC

During a recent summit of Roman Catholic leaders, one conservative bishop accused liberal colleagues of "doing the devil's work." It was all about Pope Francis and his "outreach" to people the Church has scorned: those who divorce and re-marry as well as gays and lesbians. After the "Synod," the angriest public infighting since the 1960's, 270 cardinals and bishops produced a "consensus" that observers call a conservative, victory. But Francis will have the last word. Is he a liberal reformer? Has he created expectations he can't fulfill? 1.2 billion Catholics are waiting for answers.

Guests:
Thomas Rausch, Loyola Marymount University
Inés San Martín, Crux (@inesanma)
James Martin, America magazine (@JamesMartinSJ)
Steve Skojec, OnePeterFive (@SteveSkojec)

More:
Conclusion of the Synod of Bishops
San Martín on Latin American prelates calling Synod's battles an Anglo-Saxon affair
Martin on five important things the Synod did
Skojec on why the Synod fathers should walk

Superstition over Science in Europe's GMO Policy? 52 MIN, 18 SEC

Science and ideology are in conflict in Europe, as many nations have accepted the science of climate change but are rejecting the science of genetically modified organisms, or GMO's. That's lead to a dangerous contradictions in public policy, according to a former anti-GMO activist who's warning against rejecting that technology. Mark Lynas is an environmental writer and visiting fellow at the Alliance for Science at Cornell University. He wrote an op-ed column the New York Times this weekend.


Photo: Lindsay Eyink

Guests:
Mark Lynas, Cornell Alliance for Science (@mark_lynas)

God Species

Mark Lynas

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