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FROM THIS EPISODE

Five years later, the "Arab Spring" is more often called the "Arab Uprising." Instead of producing new democracies, rebellions have led to renewed repression in some places and chaos in others. Nevertheless, it may be too soon to declare "failure."

Later on the proram, as Americans reflect on the casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan, we talk with a former State Department official who spent seven consecutive years in the war zones—and carries the blame for deaths of 31 service members.

Photo: Ramy Raoof

Producers:
Evan George

Poll Shows Strong Support for Trump among Military Members 6 MIN, 30 SEC

With the 2016 presidential campaigns heating up, pollsters are looking to the general election, but one voter constituency that doesn't get much attention is military service members. So, how is the campaign rhetoric playing with troops? The Military Times recently conducted a survey to find out. Barbara Bogaev gets details from the Times' Capitol Hill Bureau Chief, Leo Shane.

Guests:
Leo Shane, III, Military Times (@leoshane)

Does the "Arab Spring" Have a Future After All? 31 MIN, 17 SEC

It's been five years since popular uprisings toppled dictators in Egypt and other Arab countries. Except in Tunisia, Democracy has not taken hold. Egypt's new military regime may be worse than the old one; Libya is in chaos; millions of Syrians are fleeing civil war. In 2011, diverse groups were able to unify after years of repression, only to be divided again by their different interests and the need for order. But revolutions take time. We talk with authors of two new books saying it's premature to declare that the "Arab Spring" was a failure.

Guests:
Robert Worth, journalist and author (@robertfworth)
Kenan Rahmani, Syrian-American law student (@KenanRahmani)
Marc Lynch, George Washington University (@abuaardvark)

More:
Worth's 'A Rage for Order: the Middle East in Turmoil from Tahrir Square to ISIS'
Lynch's 'The New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East'

State Department Hero Reflects on the 'Mirror Test' 12 MIN, 11 SEC

For seven consecutive years, J. Kael Weston served in the combat zones of Iraq and Afghanistan -- not as a soldier, but as a civilian — a State Department Advisor. He received the Secretary of State’s Medal for Heroism. Now he’s written a searing account about his experience called The Mirror Test: America at War in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Guests:
J. Kael Weston, former State Department advisor

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