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A wildlife refuge in Southeast Oregon is the scene of the latest dispute over how to manage more than half the American West that's owned by the federal government. We update the armed protest in the context of the history of "sagebrush rebellions."

Later on the program, machines that recognize faces are already with us… but what about software that can read your emotions? The latest purchase by Apple has generated speculation about just how soon that might happen.

Photo: 

Producers:
Sarah Sweeney
Christine Detz
Evan George

Can US Job Growth Be Sustained in 2016? 6 MIN, 30 SEC

The latest numbers on America's job market are further proof that 2015 was a blockbuster year for the creation of new employment. The estimate is 292,000 new jobs in December. How long will the good news continue? That's a question being raised by Neil Irwin, senior economic correspondent at The Upshot in the New York Times.

Guests:
Neil Irwin, New York Times (@Neil_Irwin)

America's Oldest Question: Who Owns the Land? 33 MIN, 53 SEC

The current standoff at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon is the latest example of "sagebrush rebellions" that dot the history of the American West. The federal government owns a majority of the land on behalf of all Americans. But local residents become outraged if their interests aren't being protected. In this case, armed outsiders claim the right to take over, even though locals don't agree. But the basic truth of the matter is this: Cattle ranching, mining, oil drilling, recreation and environmental protection often have trouble getting along.

Guests:
Tay Wiles, High Country News (@taywiles)
John O'Keeffe, Oregon Cattlemen's Association (@OCA_ORcattle)
Jennifer Fielder, Montana State Senate (@SenatorFielder)
Bob Keiter, University of Utah (@UUtah)
Debra Donahue, University of Wyoming (@UWyonews)

More:
High Country News on the 'sagebrush rebellion'
Oregon Cattlemen's Association on Burns and the Hammonds

Apple Buys "Emotional Recognition" Startup 9 MIN, 40 SEC

Facial recognition technology is more and more common, but machines are still behind the curve when it comes to emotions. The tech world is predicting a breakthrough this year for machines that don't just recognize your face but can read your emotions.


Image: Emotient

Now that may be about to change. Apple has purchased a startup called Emotient, which specializes in software that reads emotions. The Wall Street Journal broke the story. That's where Elizabeth Dwoskin covers technology.

Guests:
Elizabeth Dwoskin, Washington Post (@lizzadwoskin)

More:
Paul Ekman on micro-expressions

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