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FROM THIS EPISODE

Hillary Clinton's second announcement for President is a low-key contrast to what's described as her "alpha-male style" the first time around.  But she's still one of the world's most famous people, hoping to raise a billion dollars between now and November of next year.  We see how it looks at the beginning.

Also, Russia agrees to sell missiles to Iran, provoking the Obama Administration, and "personal-belief exemptions" from childhood vaccinations are pitting individual rights against public health.

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Jenny Hamel

Russia Agrees to Sell Missiles to Iran, Provoking Obama Administration 6 MIN, 30 SEC

In the midst of negotiations over Iran's nuclear program, Vladimir Putin has lifted a ban on the sale to Iran of sophisticated Russian air-defense missiles.  Andrew Weiss is vice president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research on Russia and Eurasia.

Special thanks to Paul von Zielbauer for production assistance.

Guests:
Andrew S. Weiss, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (@andrewsweiss)

More:
Haaretz on Russia updating Israel on decision to lift ban on sale of missiles to Iran
Reuters on missile sales, oil-for-goods swap

Hillary Clinton Finally Does It Again 36 MIN, 24 SEC

More than a minute into a two-minute web video with "everyday Americans," talking about their futures, Hillary Clinton says what everyone already knew.

What everyone doesn't yet know is why she's running and what she stands for -- beyond becoming the first woman to capture the White House. It's a campaign announcement that's low key compared to her launch in 2007. Now she's literally "hitting the road" to Iowa in her "scooby-Doo van" -- no more helicopters or jet planes. Will her new style appeal to her party's "liberal wing."

Guests:
Jonathan Allen, Sidewire / Roll Call (@jonallendc)
Ed Kilgore, New York magazine / Democratic Strategist (@ed_kilgore)
Roger Hickey, Campaign for America's Future (@RogerHickey)
Kathie Obradovich, Des Moines Register (@KObradovich)

More:
Vox on the 11 moments that define Hillary Clinton
Allen on Clinton's video as the start of a new kind of campaign
'Saturday Night Live' sketch on the Clinton election video

HRC

Jonathan Allen

The Vaccine Debate: Public Good versus Individual Rights 6 MIN, 53 SEC

Measles was declared eradicated in the United States 15 years ago, but a recent outbreak that began in Disneyland has sparked controversy over "personal-belief exemptions." As the outbreak was spreading in Southern California, it was reported that some stricken neighborhoods had low vaccination rates. That was traced to the state's liberal allowance of "personal belief exemptions." Now an effort to ban them has led to heated controversy — not just in Sacramento but other state capitals as well. Marci Hamilton is author of God vs. the Gavel: The Perils of Extreme Religious Liberty. A professor at Benjamin Cardozo School of Law in New York, she says it's about weighing individual rights and public health.

More:
Paul Offit's 'Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All'
WWLA on whether parental choice threatens public health

God vs. the Gavel

Marci A. Hamilton

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