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FROM THIS EPISODE

Among its many crimes, the Islamic State is trafficking in ancient artifacts stolen from Palmyra and other ancient places. How big is the international black market? Who should have custody of cultural treasures? 

Later on the program, political chaos in Brazil just months before the Olympics. 

Photo: Palmyra (Pixabay)

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Paul von Zielbauer
Christine Detz

Boko Haram's Use of Child Suicide Bombers 6 MIN, 30 SEC

UNICEF reports that children are now objects of fear in Nigeria, Cameroon and Chad, because of a ten-fold increase in their use as bombers by the extremist group Boko Haram. After one young woman was freed, she told her mother she'd been trained as a suicide bomber, the mother was so afraid she turned her daughter into the military. John Campbell is a former US Ambassador to Nigeria. He's now senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of Nigeria: Dancing on the Brink.

Guests:
John Campbell, Council on Foreign Relations (@johncampbellcfr)

Nigeria

John Campbell

ISIS and the World's Cultural Heritage 33 MIN, 41 SEC

The ancient Syrian city of Palmyra has been liberated, but ISIS is still selling off looted antiquities from there and other historic places. Worldwide publicity is increasing the value of stolen objects, and there’s reportedly a thriving black market in Europe, Asia and the United States. Museums and antiquities dealers say the criminal trade is exaggerated, damaging legal business. But are private collectors protecting the heritage of the Middle East or perpetuating colonialism?

Guests:
Barbara Slavin, Atlantic Council / Al-Monitor (@barbaraslavin1)
Amr Al-Azm, Shawnee State University (@alazmamr)
Kate Fitz Gibbon, Fitz Gibbon Law / Committee for Cultural Policy
Deborah Lehr, Antiquities Coalition (@CombatLooting)

More:
Slavin on private collectors fueling demand for looted Mideast antiquities

Brazil's Government in Crisis Mode 9 MIN, 37 SEC

Just months before the Olympics, the President of Brazil is a step closer to being impeached — by other politicians arguably more corrupt than she is.


Photo: Senado Federal

There was a chaotic moment yesterday in Brazil's Congress as politicians voted to advance impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff. Will Carless is senior correspondent for the Global Post, based in Rio.

Guests:
Will Carless, PRI / Global Post (@willcarless)

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