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FROM THIS EPISODE

Some Republicans call Marco Rubio their party's Obama — and they don't mean it kindly. Others call him their best chance of heading off Donald Trump. We hear about the meteoric rise of a Cuban-American in Florida, his brief term in Washington and what happened between him and Jeb Bush.

Later on the program, big money is said to corrupt American politics, but what about small money?

Photo: Gage Skidmore

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Paul von Zielbauer
Evan George

Is Marco Rubio the New Face of the Old GOP? 39 MIN, 37 SEC

In 1998, Marco Rubio was a city commissioner in West Miami. In 2000, he was elected to Florida's House of Representatives. Just six years after that, he became the second youngest House Speaker ever — and the first Cuban-American to hold that position. Now he's a 44-year-old Senator in his first term who insists he's fully prepared for the White House. Some Republicans call him their party's Obama — and they don't mean it kindly. Others call him their best chance of heading off Donald Trump. We hear about the meteoric rise of a Cuban-American in Florida, his brief term in Washington and what happened between him and Jeb Bush.


In 1996, Marco Rubio worked on Bob Dole's presidential bid in Miami-Dade County.
Photo: Marco Rubio campaign

Guests:
Susan MacManus, University of South Florida (@DrMacManus)
Marc Caputo, Politico (@MarcACaputo)
Manuel Roig-Franzia, Washington Post (@RoigFranzia)
Peter Schorsch, FloridaPolitics.com (@SaintPetersblog)

More:
MacManus' 'Florida Politics: Ten Media Markets, One Powerful State'
Politico on Rep. Hardy's endorsement of Rubio, inability to name accomplishments

The Rise of Marco Rubio

Manuel Roig-Franzia

The Political Corruption of Small Money 10 MIN, 41 SEC

Especially since the infamous Citizens United case, we hear a lot about the political influence of Big Money. Corporations and vastly wealthy individuals pour tens of millions of dollars into statewide and national campaigns. What we don't hear a lot about is the pervasive political influence of Small Money. That's the subject of the new book, Five Dollars and a Pork Chop Sandwich: Vote Buying and the Corruption of Democracy. The author is Mary Frances Berry, former Chair of the US Commission on Civil Rights. She is a Professor of American Social Thought and History at the University of Pennsylvania.

Guests:
Mary Frances Berry, University of Pennsylvania (@drmfberry)

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