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FROM THIS EPISODE

India and Pakistan are historic enemies — both armed with nuclear weapons. Pakistan's fast-growing arsenal is a cause of mounting concern because it now includes small-short-range "tactical" nukes that could be hard to control. With Pakistan's Prime Minister due at the White House this week, we hear about nuclear security in South Asia.

Also on the program, have federal marshals in passenger planes outlived their usefulness?

Photo: Pakistani Prime Minister Sharif meets with US Secretary of State John Kerry at The Hague, March 24, 2014. (State Department)

Producers:
Sarah Sweeney
Paul von Zielbauer
Gideon Brower

Canada's Liberal New Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Politics in Canada are undergoing a major transformation with yesterday's upset election of Justin Trudeau, son of the former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. A Liberal, he's a stark contrast to long-time Conservative Stephen Harper. But, in victory, Trudeau downplayed their differences, reminding everyone, "As I've said many times over the course of this campaign, conservatives are not our enemies. They're our neighbors."

Ian Austen, who reports from Canada for the New York Times, joins us from Ottawa.

Guests:
Ian Austen, New York Times (@ianrausten)

Nuclear Weapons: The Pride of Pakistan 33 MIN, 58 SEC

Two nuclear-armed nations make South Asia one of the world's most dangerous places, with Pakistan rapidly increasing its arsenal to outpace India. Now Pakistan has developed small, short-range "tactical nukes" that could be misused by rogue commanders or seized by terrorists. That's causing alarm in India, and in Washington, where Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is due for a visit this week. The Obama White House has broken a long silence and said that nuclear safety will be on the agenda. 

Guests:
David Sanger, New York Times (@SangerNYT)
Toby Dalton, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (@toby_dalton)
Mansoor Ahmed, Harvard Kennedy School of Government (@BelferCenter)
Chidu Rajghatta, Times of India (@chidu77)

More:
Sanger on US exploring a deal to limit Pakistan's nuclear arsenal
Dalton on Pakistan's nuclear choices

Do We Still Need Air Marshals? 9 MIN, 20 SEC

After September 11, federal marshals were assigned to ride on planes to reassure jittery passengers it was safe to fly. Fourteen years later, some Congress members — and some of the marshals themselves — are asking if they’re really necessary.

Security technologist Bruce Schneier, who is a fellow at Harvard's Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, offers some thoughts on the program that has cost taxpayers $9 billion over the past ten years.

Guests:
Bruce Schneier, Harvard Berkman Center for Internet & Society (@schneierblog)

More:
Rep. Duncan on "useless" air marshal service

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