ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

The message from some 80 percent of Americans to the Federal Communications Commission is essentially, “don’t mess with the Internet.” President Obama is also on board. But major interests say “net neutrality” may not be all it’s cracked up to be.

Also,  President Obama to protect up to five million from deportation, and landing on a comet in outer space -- three times.

Photo: Photosteve101

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Gideon Brower
Claire Martin

Obama to Protect Up to Five Million from Deportation 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Republicans have already warned President Obama about “playing with fire,” but it appears he will order protection from deportation for some five million immigrants any way.  Fawn Johnson reports for the National Journal.

Guests:
Fawn Johnson, National Journal (@fawnjohnson)

Is "Net Neutrality" Essential to the American Way of Life? 33 MIN, 53 SEC

The Federal Communications Commission is faced with a crucial decision on open access to the Internet. A survey shows 80 percent of Americans want the FCC to prohibit providers from giving enhanced access to customers that pay more.  Now the President agrees.  But providers — like Time Warner Cable, Verizon and AT&T — say that will discourage innovations and investments that improve service for everyone.  As the pressure rises for FCC action, will there be toll lanes on the information super highway.

Guests:
Robert McMillan, Wired magazine (@bobmcmillan)
Robert McDowell, Wiley Rein (@McDowellTweet)
Barbara van Schewick, Stanford Center for Internet and Society (@vanschewick)
Christopher Mitchell, Institute for Local Self-Reliance (@ilsr)

More:
FCC Chairman Wheeler on Obama's Statement on an open Internet
McMillan on what everybody gets wrong in the debate over net neutrality

Internet Architecture and Innovation

Barbara van van Schewick

Rosetta Probe Lander Sending Images from Comet 9 MIN, 39 SEC

The European Space Agency’s lander called Philae is sending pictures back from a comet speeding through outer space at 11,000 miles an hour. Philae appeared to have landed in just the right place, but then bounced twice — so it actually landed three times. Now its position may be a problem. Miriam Kramer, a staff writer for the website Space.com, has more on this breakthrough in space exploration.

Guests:
Miriam Kramer, Space.com (@mirikramer)

More:
ESA Rosetta Mission on Twitter

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED