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FROM THIS EPISODE

There’s nothing new about women who want to have children delaying pregnancy until they’re actually ready. Now it’s easier than ever to beat the biological clock by freezing a woman’s eggs while they’re still viable, so she can have her kids later on. Facebook and Apple will provide insurance to cover a very expensive procedure. Advocates say that’s “family friendly.” But others call it a way to avoid paying for family leave, childcare and flexible work schedules, and some doubt that it’s safe or effective.

Also: Ebola hits New York City, and discovering a way of life as old as the human species.

Banner Image Credit: Tatiana Vdb

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Benjamin Gottlieb
Claire Martin

New York Officials Retrace Steps of Doctor with Ebola 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Nina Pham, the first nurse to contract Ebola after treating a patient in Texas, was declared cured today and released from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Meantime, a doctor who just returned from Guinea where he treated Ebola patients is the first person reported with the disease in New York City.

Shannon Pettypiece is a healthcare reporter for Bloomberg News.

Guests:
Shannon Pettypiece, Bloomberg News (@spettypi)

Is Egg Freezing a Game Changer for Women? 33 MIN, 48 SEC

“Not since the birth control pill has a medical technology had such potential to change family and career planning.” That’s from an article in Bloomberg Businessweek about the practice of freezing a women’s eggs while she’s still fertile so she can wait until she’s ready to have a child. The reporter is Emma Rosenblum.

Guests:
Emma Rosenblum, Bloomberg Businessweek (@EmmaRosenblum)
Tanya Selvaratnam, author, 'The Big Lie' (@Tselvar)
Jennifer Palumbo, Fertility Authority (@jennpal)
Pasquale Patrizio, Yale University
Seema Mohapatra, Barry University School of Law (@MohapatraSeema)

Bill Benenson On His New Documentary “The Hadza” 9 MIN, 44 SEC

The first humans learned to live off the land as hunter-gatherers in the Rift Valley of East Africa. Our species has evolved in many ways since then, but the Hazda tribe is still living the same way in the same place—50,000 years later. The Hazda: Last of the First was produced and directed by Bill Benenson, an award winning documentary and feature-film maker, whose works range from Dirt! The Movie to Boulevard Nights.

Guests:
Bill Benenson, director, 'The Hadza'

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