ON AIR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Photo: Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates testifies about potential Russian interference in the presidential election before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, DC, May 8, 2017. (Aaron P. Bernstein/Reuters)

South Korea's new president favors dialogue 6 MIN, 31 SEC

Supporters in Seoul today chanted the name of the newly elected President of South Korea, a human rights lawyer who supports dialogue with North Korea. Moon Jae-in, the South's first liberal leader in ten years, could clash with policies of the Trump Administration. James Person, who specializes in Korean history at the Wilson Center in Washington, is an advocate for negotiations with Pyongyang.

Guests:
James Person, Wilson Center

The Russians were coming. Did anyone listen? 34 MIN, 1 SEC

Yesterday's Senate testimony by former Obama Administration officials was as much a warning about elections to come as it was about last year's campaign.  But the focus was on how former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates told the Trump White House that its National Security Advisor had been compromised. She thought action was needed, but General Michael Flynn was not fired for almost three weeks — after he'd attended high-security meetings. Democrats want an independent investigation, but President Trump still calls it "fake news."  How real is Russia's threat to democracy? 

Guests:
Greg Miller, Washington Post (@gregpmiller)
Nicholas Schmidle, New Yorker magazine (@nickschmidle)
Julia Ioffe, The Atlantic (@juliaioffe)
Scott Horton, Columbia Law School / Harper's (@ColumbiaLaw)

More:
Miller on Flynn being warned by Trump transition officials about contacts with Russian ambassador
Schmidle's profile of 'Michael Flynn, General Chaos'
Ioffe on why Putin wants a face-to-face meeting with Trump

History, emotion and New Orleans confederate monuments 9 MIN, 13 SEC


Photo by Bart Everson

Faced with threats of violence, workers in New Orleans wore flak jackets in the wee hours last month, as they removed a memorial to the Crescent City White League, installed back in 1891. Mayor Mitch Landrieu told the Associated Press, "If there was ever a statue that needed to be taken down, it's that one." Will statues of Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis be next? We get some perspective from Michael Tisserand, a writer based in New Orleans and the author of Krazy: George Herriman: a Life in Black and White.

More:
Tisserand on New Orleans racism history

Krazy

Michael Tisserand

Subscribe to the 5 Things To Do newsletter

Never miss the best of what to do with your free time.

 

More From To the Point

LATEST BLOG POSTS

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED