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Photo: French President elect Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Trogneux celebrate on the stage at his victory rally near the Louvre in Paris, France May 7, 2017. (Benoit Tessier/Reuters)

Producers:
Sáša Woodruff
Katie Cooper
Luke Vander Ploeg

Administration dismisses scientists from EPA review board 6 MIN, 31 SEC

"Today I was Trumped." That's from a tweet by environmental economist Robert Richardson at Michigan State. The message continues, "I have had the pleasure of serving on the EPA Board of Scientific Counselors, and my appointment was terminated today." Coral Davenport, who covers energy and the environment for the New York Times, says the move comes at a time when members of the administration and Congress have targeted the board to bring in more industry representation.

Guests:
Coral Davenport, New York Times (@CoralMDavenport)

More:
EPA Board of Scientific Counselors

The candidate of 'savage globalism' beats the 'high priestess of fear' 33 MIN, 18 SEC

After a campaign of creative name-calling, Emmanuel Macron was elected President of France yesterday with 65% of the vote to Marine Le Pen's 35%. But right-wing populism is hardly on the run.  Macron's new party holds no seats in Parliament, and Le Pen's National Front did better than ever before. French voters made clear their outrage -- about the economy, immigration and a swelling number of refugees. We look at the consequences for France and the EU, with populist nationalism on the rise in Hungry, Poland and elsewhere in Europe.   

Guests:
Sophie Pedder, The Economist (@peddersophie)
Jonah Birch, New York University / Jacobin
James Kirchick, Foreign Policy Initiative / Daily Beast / Tablet (@jkirchick)
Yascha Mounk, Harvard University / Slate (@Yascha_Mounk)

More:
Economist on Macron's victory, Europe's 'sigh of relief'
Birch on how Macron's victory could still bolster Le Pen's National Front
Mounk on four reasons not to be cheered by Macron’s election

The End of Europe

James Kirchick

Measles strikes Minnesota town targeted by anti-vaccine activists 9 MIN, 58 SEC

Andrew Wakefield founded the movement against vaccinations — with the claim that they're responsible for autism and bowel disease. Detailed investigation has discredited Wakefield's conclusions — and Lancet, the medical journal that originally published his work has retracted it.


Photo by hdptcar

But a new measles outbreak among Somali-Americans in Minneapolis demonstrates its continuing impact. Dr. Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, says it's difficult to convince people about facts when they believe they can't trust the government.

Guests:
Michael Osterholm, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (@mtosterholm)

More:
Osterholm's Minneapolis StarTribune op-ed on unfounded fears about vaccine putting kids at risk

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