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Allergies and auto­-immune diseases like colitis are much more common than they were just decades ago­­-- some scientists believe it’s because we’re too clean-- ­ they’re testing treatments now that use bacteria and parasitic worms to restore our immune systems to a healthier balance. Bio-­hacking your gut--­­ coming up.

Later, Tesla’s auto-­pilot feature has had its first fatal crash. It could put a stop to some of the fast­-moving experimentation with self-­driving cars. We’ll talk with Wired Magazine’s car guy.

Photo: YunHo LEE

Producers:
Sasa Woodruff
Jenny Hamel
Evan George

AG Loretta Lynch accepts Officials’ Recommendations on Clinton Emails 6 MIN, 30 SEC

­­ Attorney General Loretta Lynch said today that she will accept whatever recommendations prosecutors and FBI agents make on whether to file charges in the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server as Secretary of State. She was responding to concerns about a private meeting between her and former President Bill Clinton on an airplane this week.

Guests:
Devlin Barrett, Wall Street Journal (@DevlinBarrett)

More:
Barrett's Wall Street Journal article "Bill Clinton-Loretta Lynch Airport Meeting Spurs Criticism"

When Germs Make You Healthy 33 MIN, 10 SEC

Despite huge leaps in modern medicine throughout the 20th century, certain ailments have only gotten more common-- ­­ About one in five Americans now has some kind of allergy, ranging from seasonal hay fever to life­-threatening food sensitivities.

Roughly one in 13 has an autoimmune disease-- a disorder in which the immune system tasked with our protection instead attacks our own body --­­ such as Crohn’s, lupus, and ulcerative colitis.

These diseases are twice--­­possibly three times-- ­­ more common in recent decades. Why-- ­­ and what’s to be done?

Guests:
Moises Velasquez-Manoff, Journalist and author (@moisesvm)
Mikael Knip, University of Helsinki, Finland
Dave Elliot, University of Iowa College of Medicine
Shabaana Khader, Washington University in St. Louis

More:
Velasquez-Manoff's New York Times article "Educate Your Immune System"

An Epidemic of Absence

Moises Velasquez-Manoff

First Fatal Collision for Tesla's Autopilot Feature 9 MIN, 52 SEC

Some 30 thousand people die in car collisions each year in the U.S. But a single fatal collision this May is suddenly getting special attention. It was the first time that a driver using the Tesla Model S “Auto­-pilot” feature died on the road. ­­­­

In other words it was the first fatal crash involving a car using semi­-autonomous technology that is still being tested. It didn’t come as a complete surprise to industry watchers who’ve warned for months that Tesla drivers were abusing the autopilot feature. Alex Davies was part of that chorus, he’s the editor of WIRED’s transportation section.

Photo: Tesla Model S (Wikicommons)

Guests:
Alex Davies, Wired magazine (@adavies47)

More:
Davies WIRED article "Tesla’s Autopilot Has Had Its First Deadly Crash"

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