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Photo: Mrs. Gemstone

Political fallout from FBI document releases 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Today, for the first time, President Obama spoke publicly about the FBI Director James Comey's latest comments on Hillary Clinton's email troubles. "There is a norm that when there are investigations we don't operate on innuendo, we don't operate on incomplete information, we don't operate on leaks."

The President made his comments during an interview with NowThisNews. Rosalind Helderman, political reporter for the Washington Post, has an update.

Guests:
Rosalind Helderman, Washington Post (@PostRoz)

More:
Today's Washington Post-ABC tracking poll on presidential race

Ballot box battles as the race comes down to the wire 34 MIN, 4 SEC

In many states, Republican claims of widespread "voter fraud" have led to photo ID laws and other restrictions that Democrats call "voter suppression." Donald Trump, who's gained political traction with the claim that next week's election is "rigged" against him, takes it a step further by calling on his supporters to try to prevent it. "Go down to certain areas and watch and study and make sure other people don't come in and vote five times. Democrats call that code for "intimidation" — especially in black and Latino neighborhoods important to the Clinton campaign. They've already filed suit against "Ballot Security Task Forces" organized by Trump supporters in several states. We hear what could be in store at polling places during early voting — and on Election Day.

Guests:
Christina Wilkie, Huffington Post (@christinawilkie)
Rick Hasen, University of California, Irvine (@rickhasen)
Jay DeLancy, Voter Integrity Project (@VoteChecker)
Allison Riggs, Southern Coalition for Social Justice (@scsj)
Daniel Cox, PRRI (@DCoxPRRI)

More:
Wilkie on Trump loyalists' planned voter intimidation using fake ID badges, fake exit polling
Wilkie on Trump encouraging supporters to vote twice

The Voting Wars

Richard L. Hasen

Standing Rock: Battle to block Dakota Pipeline continues 9 MIN, 18 SEC

The Dakota Pipeline is almost finished, but Native American protest continues and President Obama may have a new idea.


Protestors against the Dakota Access Pipeline stand-off with police in this aerial photo
of Highway 1806 and County Road 134 near the town of Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
Morton County Sheriff's Office/Handout via Reuters

In Cannon Ball, North Dakota last week, police in riot gear traveled in armored personnel carriers to confront protesters on foot and on horseback. It was the lasts confrontation in seven months of protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. One reporter feared that somebody might get killed. She's Lynda Mapes with the Seattle Times.

Guests:
Lynda Mapes, Seattle Times (@LyndaVMapes)

More:
Mapes on Obama's consideration of rerouting pipelins
Protestors Go Fund Me campaign

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