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FROM THIS EPISODE

Five years later, the "Arab Spring" is more often called the "Arab Uprising." Instead of producing new democracies, rebellions have led to renewed repression in some places and chaos in others. But, we hear why it may be too soon to declare "failure."

Later on the program, Cruz and Kasich team up against Trump.

Photo: Ramy Raoof

Producers:
Evan George
Paul von Zielbauer
Christine Detz

Cleveland to Pay $6 Million to Tamir Rice's Family 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Prosecutors in Cleveland refused to press charges against the police officer who shot and killed 12-year old Tamir Rice two years ago.  But today, the city settled a lawsuit filed by Rice's family for six million dollars -- and it's not the first such case of its kind, as we hear from Wesley Lowery, national reporter for the Washington Post.

Guests:
Wesley Lowery, Washington Post (@WesleyLowery)

More:
Wall Street Journal on the cost of police misconduct

Does the "Arab Spring" Have a Future After All? 32 MIN, 56 SEC

It's been five years since popular uprisings toppled dictators in Egypt and other Arab countries. Except in Tunisia, Democracy has not taken hold. Egypt's new military regime may be worse than the old one; Libya is in chaos; millions of Syrians are fleeing civil war. In 2011, diverse groups were able to unify after years of repression, only to be divided again by their different interests and the need for order. But revolutions take time. We talk with authors of two new books saying it's premature to declare that the "Arab Spring" was a failure.

Guests:
Robert Worth, journalist and author (@robertfworth)
Marc Lynch, George Washington University (@abuaardvark)
Kenan Rahmani, Syrian-American law student (@KenanRahmani)

More:
Worth's 'A Rage for Order: the Middle East in Turmoil from Tahrir Square to ISIS'
Lynch's 'The New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East'

Can a Cruz-Kasich Partnership Stop Trump? 10 MIN, 23 SEC

For Ted Cruz and John Kasich, "the enemy of my enemy is my friend." Donald Trump is looking like a big winner tomorrow in several Northeastern states. So Ted Cruz and John Kasich are joining forces by agreeing to divide their resources in Indiana, New Mexico and Oregon.


Photos of Ted Cruz and John Kasich by Gage Skidmore

Larry Sabato, Director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics and Editor in Chief of Sabato's Crystal Ball, has more on how the Kasich and Cruz are joining forces against Trump.

Guests:
Larry Sabato, University of Virginia Center for Politics (@larrysabato)

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