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FROM THIS EPISODE

Republican majorities will try to reverse the President’s war on greenhouse emissions- and increase domestic production of fossil fuels.How will the President and other Democrats respond?

Also, Obama touts the US-China relationship at the APEC Summit, and awards for science worth more than twice as much as the Nobel Prize.

Photo: The Valdez Marine Terminal of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System seen from the air

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Jenny Hamel
Andrea Brody

Obama Touts China Relationship at APEC Summit 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Just a week after being rebuffed by American voters in the midterm elections, President Obama’s in China today for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit.  In Beijing, he announced visa expansions and stronger trade relation with China. Jonathan Pollack is Director of the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution.

Guests:
Jonathan Pollack, Brookings Institution (@BrookingsChina)

No Exit

Jonathan D. Pollack

When It Comes to Climate Change, Elections Matter 36 MIN, 5 SEC

Climate scientists say the danger is greater than ever, but Republicans call last week’s election a mandate to roll back EPA rules against greenhouse emissions.  That’s the top priority of the incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.  And the likely Environment Committee chair says climate change is a “hoax.” First up may be the Keystone XL pipeline, as the GOP pushes issues Democratic leaders never raised due to fears they might pass Congress.  We hear what else is on the agenda and how Democrats and the President might respond.  

Guests:
Ben Geman, National Journal (@Ben_Geman)
Michael Mann, Pennsylvania State University (@MichaelEMann)
Bob Inglis, Energy and Enterprise Initiative (@bobinglis)
Gwen Holdmann, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

More:
Senator Inhofe’s response to the International Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Synthesis Report
State Department on Keystone XL Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement
RepublicEn
German on McConnell's coal conundrum

Silicon Valley Rolls Out Red Carpet, Big Bucks for Science 7 MIN, 23 SEC

At a lavish ceremony last night near San Francisco, 60 biologists, physicists and mathematicians shared a total of $36 million in prizes.  Eleven got $3 million each — twice the cash value of the Nobel Prize.  The so-called “breakthrough prizes” for scientists were created two years ago by Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Google founder Sergey Brin, and the Russian billionaire and venture capitalist Yuri Milner. James Temple is senior editor at Re/code, a science and tech website. He attended the awards ceremony last night.

Guests:
James Temple, Real Estate Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle (@jtemple)

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