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FROM THIS EPISODE

The City of Santa Monica wants to close its airport next year. The Federal Aviation Administration is saying, “no way”—and a legal battle is raging. Does the airport matter to the regional economy—or is it public property for the exclusive use of rich private pilots like Harrison Ford? We’ll hear about noise, air pollution, safety and the potential value of 227 acres of urban land.

Also, a preview of the LA Board of Supervisors race, and an oilfield near Bakersfield pumps hundreds of thousands of barrels… of water?

Banner Image: Santa Monica Airport; Credit: ryangs

Shriver Gets Key Endorsement in Supervisor’s Race 6 MIN, 50 SEC

In the primary for termed-out Zev Yaroslavsky on the LA Board of Supervisors, Sheila Keuhl got 36% of the vote, Bobby Shriver 29%, and West Hollywood Councilman John Duran got a surprising 16%. Today, Duran endorsed Shriver for the November final election. Catherine Saillant covers politics for the LA Times.

Guests:
Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times (@csaillant2)

Aviation Groups Fight Effort to Close Santa Monica Airport 11 MIN, 39 SEC
One hundred years ago, the Santa Monica Airport was Clover Field, where Douglas Aircraft pioneered aviation. It was used by the Army Air Corps during World War II, and then turned back to the City, which agreed to keep it running. As residential neighborhoods developed nearby, there’s been increasing concern about noise and air pollution, potential accidents—and property values. Now the City Council wants to close it down in July of next year.

Guests:
Frank Gruber, Airport2Park (@FrankforCouncil)
John Jerabek, Santa Monica Airport Association (@JohnJerabek)

Kern River Oil Fields Serve as Water Resource During Drought 6 MIN, 47 SEC

In the midst of continuing drought, and angry debate about fracking, a Chevron Company oil field is an unlikely source of water. But there’s a field near Bakersfield that produces 10 times more water than oil, and that’s helping Central Valley farmers keep their crops alive. Lauren Sommer reports on energy and the environment for KQED public broadcasting in San Francisco.

Guests:
Lauren Sommer, KQED (@lesommer)

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