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FROM THIS EPISODE

Parking tickets provided $161 million in revenue last year for the City of Los Angeles. The average cost of a parking ticket was $68. Is that too much -- or not enough -- to keep business and traffic flowing? As City Hall studies the issue, will voters get a chance to decide? Also, the State Senate’s new leader promises to restore public trust in an era of rampant corruption. We talk with Kevin de León of Los Angeles. Plus, hard work in the strawberry fields and a language nobody else can understand.

Photo by Aaron van Dorn

Parking Reform Made Easy

Richard W. Willson

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Evan George

New President Pro Tem of the California State Senate 6 MIN, 58 SEC

The California State Senate has been rocked with scandal this year. Roderick Wright of Inglewood was convicted of perjury. Leland Yee of San Francisco is under federal indictment for smuggling weapons. Ron Calderón of Los Angeles faces corruption and bribery charges. Now, Kevin de León of Los Angeles has been unanimously elected President Pro Tem of the Upper House, saying that his priorities include restoring public trust in the legislature. 

Guests:
Kevin de León, California State Senate (@kdleon)

More:
Sacramento Bee on de León's selection as President Pro Tem of the California Senate

Does Parking Punishment Fit the Crime? 15 MIN, 22 SEC

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti says his office is working with "stakeholders" to address frustrations about parking citations, which now average $68 a ticket and provided $161 million last year to the city's general fund. If there aren't satisfactory changes, the grassroots Los Angeles Parking Freedom Initiative says it will seek a vote of the people.

Guests:
Steven Vincent, Los Angeles Parking Freedom Initiative (@ParkingFreedom)
Richard Willson, Cal Poly Pomona
Mott Smith, Civic Enterprise (@CivicEnterprise)

More:
Civic Enterprise on parking stations
LA Times on Garcetti's panel to look at parking ticket policies

Indigenous Farm Workers Suffer from Lack of Mental Health Services 5 MIN, 38 SEC

In the strawberry fields near Oxnard, workers from remote parts of Mexico and Central America toil at some of the hardest jobs in California agriculture. Not only are they separated from their families, they're further isolated by language. They don't speak English or Spanish, but a very different, tonal language called Mixteco. Hannah Guzik is a writer and assignment editor for the California Health Report

Guests:
Hannah Guzik, California Health Report (@HannahBGuzik)

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