ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

The history of Los Angeles is the history of water, and that’s likely the future, too.  The prospect of ongoing drought has Mayor Eric Garcetti serious about projects rejected or ignored by past city leaders.

Also, Frances Anderton talks to the architect who demolished the home where Ray Bradbury lived and worked until he died.

Photo: Barb Howe

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Evan George

Turning the Water Off…and On 17 MIN, 46 SEC

With years of reduced rain and snow now predicted, Mayor Eric Garcetti wants to reduce LA's dependence on imported water. He also wants to cut water usage by 20% in less than two years. But efficiency and conservation won't be enough. Garcetti says the City that once rejected what was called "toilet to tap" is now ready to recycle wastewater — like Orange County already does. Can LA capture the rain that does fall instead of washing it out to sea? 

Guests:
Matt Petersen, City of Los Angeles (@mattspete)
Mark Gold, UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability (@uclaioes)
Andy Lipkis, TreePeople (@treepeople_org)

More:
California Friendly Landscape Incentive Program
Proposition 1: Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Treatment, and Storage Projects

Starchitect Thom Mayne Shares His Plans for the Bradbury Site 7 MIN, 26 SEC

When fans heard that the home of the late science fiction master Ray Bradbury had all but disappeared, there was a kind of mourning. Some preservationists said the house in Cheviot Hills might have been a historic landmark. But it turns out that the man who destroyed it is a master in his own right: Thom Mayne has been called one of the world's premier architects.

Frances Anderton, host of KCRW's DnA, discovered that Mayne and his wife, Blythe Alison-Mayne have plans that might have intrigued Ray Bradbury.

Upcoming

View Schedule

New Episodes

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED