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The Christian group InterVarsity has been “de-recognized” by all 23 California State University campuses—because its leaders must adhere to evangelical views of the Bible. Is the schools’ demand for openness a denial of religious freedom? We’ll hear both sides.

Also, it’s not the guards who really maintain order at Pelican Bay, California’s maximum-security prison. It’s criminal gangs as sophisticated in organization as corporate executives.

Banner Image Credit: roanokecollege

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Sonya Geis

Bias v. Religious Freedom on the Cal State University Campus 13 MIN, 36 SEC

InterVarsity is an evangelical Christian group with 860 chapters at American colleges and universities. It’s been around for almost 70 years, but lately it’s being challenged by some institutions. A year ago, the 23-campus California State University System officially “de-recognized” InterVarsity, but the group is fighting back. It’s all about by-laws laying out the requirements for leadership.

Guests:
Kimberly Winston, Religion News Service (@kjwinston11)
Greg Jao, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (@GregJao)
Fram Virjee, Cal State University (@calstate)

Gangs an Unlikely Source of Order at Pelican Bay 5 MIN, 58 SEC

Pelican Bay is California’s maximum-security prison on the coast near the Oregon border—recently famous for hunger strikes and allegations of torture. It’s as dangerous as any place of its kind, full of inmates serving life sentences, but it’s prison gangs—not the guards—who keep order. That’s according to Graeme Wood, one of the few outsiders who have been there. He wrote about it for the Atlantic magazine, where he’s a contributing editor.

Guests:
Graeme Wood, Atlantic Magazine (@gcaw)

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