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FROM THIS EPISODE

Three people have died this year in the worst outbreak of West Nile Virus in Orange County history. Why is it so vulnerable to infestation? Widespread spraying for mosquitos is planned for densely populated Santa Ana, and landowners who refuse inspectors access to suspect properties will be subject to court warrants.

Also, we’ll talk about a documentary that traces the history of using SWAT teams for local police, from LA's Watts Riots of 1965 to Ferguson, Missouri.

Banner Image Credit: JJ Harrison

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Claire Martin

With West Nile, Who Are the Real Pests? 16 MIN, 47 SEC

Los Angeles has seen a decline this year in infections of the deadly West Nile Virus. But Orange County has recorded 94 cases when last year, during this same period, there were just two. One death in Seal Beach, another in Huntington Beach and a third in Santa Ana prove how serious the problem can be.

Guests:
Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times (@gottliebjeff)
Robert Cummings, Orange County Vector Control District
Ryan Harrigan, UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability (@UCLAIoES)

SWAT’s LA Roots 6 MIN, 10 SEC

The militarization of local police was a major reason for massive protests last month after Michael Brown was shot by an officer in Ferguson, Missouri. It’s no accident that the force resembled the SWAT teams begun in Los Angeles in the aftermath of the Watts Riots of 1965. Olivia Katrandjian is a reporter for the series "SWAT: Mission Creep" for Retro Report, a project of the New York Times.

Guests:
Olivia Katrandjian, Retro Report (@okatrandjian)

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