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FROM THIS EPISODE

Predictions of a low turnout were exceeded by reality in yesterday's LA elections. Between 8 and 9% of eligible voters bothered to go to the polls.

Also, the City of Compton had an unlikely cowboy culture until 3 years ago when the stable burned down. We hear about the campaign to revive it.

Photo: Steve Rhodes

Producers:
Evan George
Jenny Hamel

Los Angeles Is a Democracy: Why Do So Few People Care? 16 MIN, 15 SEC

If low voter turnout is a disaster, it's time to declare an emergency in the City of LA. Yesterday — in City Council and School Board districts containing hundreds of thousands of people -- some candidates won office with totals of five or 6000 votes. Is it time to pay the poor if they go to the polls and fine the rich if they don't?  Should you be able to vote on your phone?

Guests:
Alice Walton, Los Angeles Times (@TheCityMaven)
Joe Mathews, Host, "Zocalo's Connecting California" (@joemmathews)
Jessica Levinson, Loyola Law School (@LevinsonJessica)

More:
Walton on low voter turnout
Mathews' solution to low voter turnout
LA residents explain why they did -- or didn't -- go to the polls (LA Times)

California Crackup

Joe Mathews

Telling the Story of the Cowboys of Compton 10 MIN, 38 SEC

Southern California is an industrialized megalopolis, but its agricultural history continues in some unlikely places.  One of them is the City of Compton, where a few cowboys still ride their horses — despite the fact that their stable mysteriously burned down three years ago.  We talk to a Compton cowboy and a documentary filmmaker who’s trying to tell their story.

Guests:
Ghuan Featherstone, long-time horse enthusiast
Brett Fallentine, filmmaker

More:
Kickstarter campaign for 'Fire on the Hill: The Story of the Compton Cowboys '
'Fire on the Hill' Facebook page

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