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Public Health, Childhood Vaccines and Autism

Many childhood diseases have been eradicated by vaccinations, but many parents believe the vaccines cause another problem, autism. Scientists and a special federal court disagree. We hear about the consequences of a dispute that won't go away. On our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, President Obama says Chrysler and GM and have made “good faith efforts” to restructure their companies, but not good enough. They'll get 30 and 60 days respectively to do better or face bankruptcy. He said their problems are due to failures of leadership.

Main Topic

An Ultimatum for General Motors and Chrysler ()

President Obama says General Motors and Chrysler have failed to justify their requests for $17 more billions of federal dollars. Bankruptcy is a real possibility. GM has 60 days to come up with a better plan for reorganization; Chrysler has 30 days to pull together a merger with Fiat of Italy. Even if the companies do go bankrupt, Obama insists that he won't let the auto industry die, saying that Washington will back the warranties on all their new cars. Will today's drastic actions help to restore it or drive it over a cliff?

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Main Topic

Public Health, Childhood Vaccines and Autism ()

Last month, a special three-judge federal panel declared that vaccines against childhood diseases did not cause autism in some children. One judge said he had “deep sympathy and admiration” for the families involved, but that he, “must decide this case not on sentiment, but by analyzing the evidence.” Nevertheless, the number of parents who believe there is a connection is on the increase. Yesterday, the Los Angeles Times reported that in California, “hundreds of elementary schools are at risk for outbreaks of childhood diseases eradicated in the US years ago.”

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Reporter's Notebook

New Women’s Pro Soccer League Kicks Off ()

The Women's United Soccer Association got a big push in 1999, when Mia Hamm, Michelle Akers and their teammates won the Women's World Cup.  But even with tens of millions of dollars, the Association folded in 2003. Yesterday at the Home Depot Center in Carson, a new league called Women's Professional Soccer played its first game. There are seven teams, including the Sol of Los Angeles, which features Marta, Brazil's world player of the year.  Nick Green is soccer columnist for the Daily News.

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Underwriters

Which Way L.A.? is made possible in part by the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, and the John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation, which supports study and research into policy issues of the Los Angeles region.

 

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