NeueHouse moves into the storied Bradbury Building

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A rendering of the cafe and bar at NeueHouse Bradbury. Renderings by DesignAgency, courtesy of Neuehouse

A storied Victorian-era building in downtown LA has opened its doors to a new tenant: the private shared working space and social club NeueHouse.

The marvelous Bradbury Building was made famous in the 1982 sci-fi classic “Blade Runner,” when director Ridley Scott filled it with neon and smoke. It’s been a popular filming location for half a century, and a must-see stop for tourists and architecture buffs.

The Romanesque Revival-style building is noted for its interior. Linda Dishman, president and CEO of the LA Conservancy, describes it as an “explosion of balconies and stairs and Victorian elevators that go up and down.”

The entire roof is made of glass, allowing beams of light to enter the space.


A rendering of the lobby at NeueHouse Bradbury. Renderings by DesignAgency, courtesy of Neuehouse

“There are very few buildings that evoke an immediate emotional response to pretty much anyone that walks in. And that's what you get when you come into the atrium of the Bradbury Building,” says NeueHouse CEO Josh Wyatt.

The second floor, which was once occupied by the Los Angeles Police Department’s Internal Affairs Division, is now home to the self-described creative community. NeueHouse has taken over 25,000 square feet of floor space.


A rendering of the gallery at NeueHouse Bradbury. Renderings by DesignAgency, courtesy of Neuehouse

“We as a company have always been fascinated and motivated by … historically significant and architecturally iconic buildings. And this is probably ... the most architecturally significant building in Los Angeles,” Wyatt says.

The downtown branch follows the creation of NeueHouse Hollywood, which occupies the former CBS broadcasting facility.

The Bradbury Building's balconies, stairs and Victorian elevators. Photo by Avishay Artsy/KCRW

NeueHouse worked with the firm DesignAgency to create the Bradbury’s interiors, which includes a cafe and bar.

“When we think about the majestic, masculine nature of the iron and atrium, we really wanted to create an ethereal and calming and welcoming, a little bit more feminine feel, with a lot of muted colors and soft textures. That was our goal -- to create this oasis in downtown LA,” Mekhayech says.