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FROM THIS EPISODE

How the MS-13 gang spread from Los Angeles to New York 10 MIN, 31 SEC

During President Trump’s State of the Union on Tuesday night, he talked about two teenage girls on Long Island who were murdered by MS-13 gang members in 2016. Their parents were in the House chamber during the speech. Trump mentioned MS-13 four times, saying members have long taken advantage of immigration loopholes to enter the US and threaten safety. However, MS-13 was actually formed in Los Angeles in the 1980s.

Guests:
Jonathan Blitzer, New Yorker magazine (@JonathanBlitzer)
Robert Lopez, former LA Times reporter (@LAJourno)

After State of the Union, is there bipartisan movement on immigration policy? 7 MIN, 19 SEC

Trump pushed for big changes in immigration policy in State of the Union address. He said he wants to work with both parties to protect Americans’ safety, their families and communities, because “Americans are dreamers, too.” The White House immigration plan would allow about 1.8 million young undocumented immigrants to pursue legal status in exchange for more border security, and ending the diversity visa lottery and family-based migration.

Guests:
Dara Lind, Vox (@DLind)

More:
Trump’s biggest insult to immigrants in his State of the Union

What will it take to get more Angelenos on public transit? 9 MIN, 23 SEC

The number of bus and train trips taken in LA dropped 15 percent between 2012 and 2017. But last year, LA County voters passed Measure M, a sales tax increase to generate $120 billion for transit projects. So why aren’t more people getting out of their cars, and what can we do about it? A new UCLA study looks into that.

Guests:
Anna Scott, Producer, 'Press Play' (@AnnaKCRW)

Why is Appalachia so misunderstood? 11 MIN, 58 SEC


Elizabeth Catte is a historian from east Tennessee. 

People in Appalachia voted Donald Trump into office. But the popular conception of that region as a backwards, racist place is wrong, according to one historian from east Tennessee. She explains why the hillbilly narrative persists.

Guests:
Elizabeth Catte, author, “What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia” (@elizabethcatte)

Remembering LA ceramicist Dora De Larios 7 MIN, 24 SEC


Dora De Larios in her studio courtesy of Star Montana

Artist Dora De Larios created everything from small, functional tableware to giant ceramic sculptures. She incorporated Native American and Japanese influences in her art. She died on Sunday at 84. A retrospective of her work opens in February at the Main Museum downtown.


Dora De Larios' 1990s "Small Blue Animal." 


Dora De Larios' 1982 work "Inner Vision." 

Photos of Dora De Larios's art courtesy of Main Museum

Guests:
Carolina Miranda, Los Angeles Times (@cmonstah)

More:
Ceramic artist Dora De Larios on shaping her own path by melding the Mexican, Japanese and Modern
Dora De Larios: Other Worlds

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