All Things Considered (Weekend)

All Things Considered (Weekend)

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National Public Radio's weekend afternoon newsmagazine.

Recent Stories

Lawyers for the video-sharing app are likely to say the executive order was unconstitutional, arguing the company was not informed, as is standard, and the national-security concerns are baseless.

An overwhelming majority of Americans say houses of worship should abide by the same restrictions on public gatherings that apply to other institutions.

Attorney General William Barr says he won't take any action to influence the presidential election, but looming in the background is a probe apparently focused on the Obama administration.

NPR Music has launched The South Got Something To Say, a canon of Southern hip-hop. Its creator, critic Briana Younger, and NPR's Rodney Carmichael explained the project on <em>All Things Considered</em>.

The state was the last one to include the Confederate battle emblem on its flag. Reuben Anderson, chair of the redesign commission, discusses the proposals and what the change means for Mississippi.

Sandy Villatoro, a housekeeper who lost her job in March, doesn't know how she'll pay the bills for her family of four now that the additional $600 weekly in federal aid she was receiving has expired.

Nuclear weapons have given Hollywood a host of dramatic plot possibilities, from the threat of nuclear war to wholesale destruction to over-the-top fireworks.

Hair is soft compared with steel, but shaving can dull a razor surprisingly quickly. A new study examines exactly how a strand of hair can chip and crack a sharp blade.

The coronavirus pandemic has made some past polling locations, like grocery stores and nursing homes, less appealing this year. So state officials are searching elsewhere.

The National Hockey League has resumed its season in two "bubbles" in Edmonton and Toronto, Canada. The league says it's administered 7,000 coronavirus tests to players, with zero positive cases.

Dr. Paul Offit, who serves on the Food and Drug Administration's vaccine advisory board, says he doesn't think an effective vaccine that's undergone adequate testing can be ready this year.

Amid high temperatures and a pandemic, green spaces are a lifeline. But new data shows parks in low-income and nonwhite areas are smaller and more crowded than those in high-income and white areas.

More from KCRW

Some companies are in phase three trials for COVID-19 vaccines. KCRW looks at the work being done by Moderna, Pfizer, and AstraZeneca.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The coronavirus pandemic shut down two of Disney’s most profitable businesses, theme parks and movie distribution, but a strong showing for its subscription services was enough to…

from The Business

Josh Barro, Megan McArdle and Dorian Warren talk about the stalemate in Congress, July jobs report, and what should be done about an increase in violent crime.

from Left, Right & Center

The Latest

There's a tentative agreement between the teachers union and the district. The plan calls for a 30-hour school week, attendance-taking, and time for student and family counseling.

Teachers make sense of new guidelines for distance learning — before school starts on Aug 18

There's a tentative agreement between the teachers union and the district. The plan calls for a 30-hour school week, attendance-taking, and time for student and family counseling.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

This morning, Congress stalled again in negotiations over another pandemic relief bill. Today is the self-imposed deadline to reach a deal.

Gridlock in Washington over extending PPP: What it means for California workers

This morning, Congress stalled again in negotiations over another pandemic relief bill. Today is the self-imposed deadline to reach a deal.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Disney reported losses of $4.7 billion last quarter in their latest earnings call. Still, investors saw promise in the company’s streaming revenue, as Disney’s stock rose 10%.

Disney lost nearly $5 billion last quarter, but stock prices surged

Disney reported losses of $4.7 billion last quarter in their latest earnings call. Still, investors saw promise in the company’s streaming revenue, as Disney’s stock rose 10%.

from Hollywood Breakdown

The president also issued an executive order aimed at cutting ties between the U.S. and the owner of the popular Chinese communications and social media app WeChat.

Trump signs executive order that will effectively ban use of TikTok in the U.S.

The president also issued an executive order aimed at cutting ties between the U.S. and the owner of the popular Chinese communications and social media app WeChat.

from NPR

Fifty-five years ago today, a historic piece of federal legislation was signed into law: The Voting Rights Act.

What voter suppression looks like today — 55 years after Voting Rights Act was signed into law

Fifty-five years ago today, a historic piece of federal legislation was signed into law: The Voting Rights Act.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Some polls show that about half of all Americans plan to get a vaccine as soon as one is available.

How many Americans must get a COVID-19 vaccine to achieve herd immunity?

Some polls show that about half of all Americans plan to get a vaccine as soon as one is available.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

California has more than 530,000 confirmed coronavirus cases so far. Without a vaccine, that number will continue to grow into fall and potentially winter.

COVID-19 rises among California’s young population

California has more than 530,000 confirmed coronavirus cases so far. Without a vaccine, that number will continue to grow into fall and potentially winter.

from Greater LA

New York's attorney general announced civil action to dissolve the National Rifle Association after an investigation found millions of dollars in alleged fraud by CEO Wayne LaPierre and others.

New York attorney general moves to dissolve The NRA After Fraud Investigation

New York's attorney general announced civil action to dissolve the National Rifle Association after an investigation found millions of dollars in alleged fraud by CEO Wayne LaPierre and others.

from NPR