Morning Edition

Morning Edition

Hosted by , , ,
2 hr

National Public Radio's morning newsmagazine.

Recent Stories

Federal and state law enforcement are asking questions about Zoom's security and privacy policies, as millions flock to the videoconferencing service for meetings, classes and social gatherings.

In a <em>StoryCorps </em>conversation recorded in 2015, Chloe Longfellow, 32, remembers the grandmother who raised her and taught her to cook.

Mike Bloomberg's presidential bid didn't last long, but he promised staffers jobs through November. Now some who were abruptly laid off during a pandemic are detailing how they say they were misled.

For the first time in nearly a decade, the economy suffered a net loss of jobs as the coronavirus began to take hold in the country. The unemployment rate shot up to 4.4%.

Henry Paulson, who served during the 2008 financial crisis, says sending money rapidly to people and businesses will be the key to limiting damage to the economy.

The British government is under fire for only testing a tiny percentage of National Health Service staff as deaths from COVID-19 in the United Kingdom quickly rise to nearly 3,000.

Three roommates in Spain, who call themselves Stay Homas, are using their skills as professional musicians to come out with a new song about the coronavirus every day as they self-quarantine.

In her graphic memoir,<em> </em>cartoonist Huda Fahmy explains how her parents played a role in her romantic relationships. She hopes her book is representation "for people who want to find love in this way."

Many low-wage workers with essential jobs — like grocery store cashiers and stockers — can't stay home to protect themselves and their families. The protections they receive vary widely.

With limits on social gatherings, Americans have to mourn their dead through online memorials and virtual funerals.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews make up about 12% of Israel's population — but account for many of Israel's COVID-19 cases. This week a senior rabbi finally urged his followers to obey government lockdown orders.

The government ordered lenders to let homeowners skip payments if they lost income because of the coronavirus. But landlords can require renters to pay even if they've lost their jobs. And many are.

More from KCRW

Generations of listeners have celebrated the signature songs of the artist who died this week at 81. But Withers' greater catalog reveals a man who stuck to his beliefs in the face of the pop machine.

from NPR

An employee of the Union Rescue became the first person on Skid Row to be diagnosed with COVID-19. He was picking up and delivering basic supplies like food and first aid equipment.

from Greater LA

Health care workers are now dealing with higher levels of depression and anxiety. They’re suffering panic attacks. Some are contemplating suicide.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Latest

Governor Gavin Newsom rolled out a new program called the California Health Corps this week.

To fight COVID-19 surge, California Health Corps recruits retired, international doctors

Governor Gavin Newsom rolled out a new program called the California Health Corps this week.

from KCRW Features

AT&T has appointed former Hulu CEO Jason Kilar as the new head of WarnerMedia. That means he’ll oversee HBO, HBO Max, CNN, Warner Bros. and other WarnerMedia properties.

Hollywood news banter: New WarnerMedia CEO; virtual SXSW

AT&T has appointed former Hulu CEO Jason Kilar as the new head of WarnerMedia. That means he’ll oversee HBO, HBO Max, CNN, Warner Bros. and other WarnerMedia properties.

from The Business

Federal and state law enforcement are asking questions about Zoom's security and privacy policies, as millions flock to the videoconferencing service for meetings, classes and social gatherings.

A Must For Millions, Zoom Has A Dark Side — And An FBI Warning

Federal and state law enforcement are asking questions about Zoom's security and privacy policies, as millions flock to the videoconferencing service for meetings, classes and social gatherings.

from NPR

Are the president’s daily coronavirus briefings standing in for his high-energy rallies?

Front row at the Trump show

Are the president’s daily coronavirus briefings standing in for his high-energy rallies?

from Left, Right & Center

In the land of gridlock, car accidents are down and the mayor has ordered more red lights to slow traffic.

A Coronavirus Plus: Wide-Open Highways In Los Angeles

In the land of gridlock, car accidents are down and the mayor has ordered more red lights to slow traffic.

from NPR

The crowded, unsanitary conditions on Skid Row are a breeding ground for disease.  Now the area has its first confirmed case.

Skid Row’s first COVID-19 case

The crowded, unsanitary conditions on Skid Row are a breeding ground for disease.  Now the area has its first confirmed case.

from Greater LA

For people sheltering in place, our critics recommend movies that might be falling under the radar: “Portrait Of A Lady On Fire” (Hulu), set in 1770 France, in which a painter observes…

‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’ is one of the best movies of the decade, critic says

For people sheltering in place, our critics recommend movies that might be falling under the radar: “Portrait Of A Lady On Fire” (Hulu), set in 1770 France, in which a painter observes…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Despite record-breaking unemployment numbers in March, thousands of people are still working during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Undocumented farm laborers are essential during COVID-19 pandemic, face safety risks

Despite record-breaking unemployment numbers in March, thousands of people are still working during the COVID-19 pandemic.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand