Weekend Edition Saturday

Weekend Edition Saturday

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NPR's Saturday morning news program.

Recent Stories

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the 100th anniversary of the Negro National League as a response to segregation in major league baseball.

The president says no one told him about the threat to U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Reports say the information was available in a detailed intelligence file called the President's Daily Briefing.

In his new book, <em>Surrender, White People!</em>, Hughley suggests we consider whether our national holidays speak to the entire nation — along with other bitingly funny ideas for addressing injustice.

Transgender people in Idaho say two new state laws are aimed at making their lives much harder. One involves changing the sex listed on birth certificates. The other affects trans athletes.

In<em> A Most Beautiful Thing, </em>Arshay Cooper shares the story of how he, and others from rival gang neighborhoods on Chicago's West Side, found their way to crew — and each other.

The city's first parade celebrating LGBTQ identity took place a year after the Stonewall Uprising. Due to COVID-19, this year's event is virtual, featuring a 24-hour line up of global performances.

Scott Simon reflects on the LGBTQ people who helped raise him, who would have benefited from the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in an employment discrimination case this week.

As researchers herald dexamethasone as a potential breakthrough treatment for critically ill patients, Dr. Kirsten Lyke says publicizing research that hasn't been rigorously vetted could erode trust.

In Doyle's new novel, two old friends meet at a Dublin pub for a night of reconnecting and hard drinking. Joe has a burning secret; Davy has a concealed sorrow.

Welsh actor Matthew Rhys stars in the HBO version of the 1960s legal drama. This Perry Mason is a seamy, slovenly private eye in 1932 Los Angeles. "He doesn't fit in in any way," Rhys says.

NPR's Scott Simon dusts off some history behind the naming of two army bases after Confederate officers, and what Braxton Bragg and Henry Benning actually stood for.

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Michael Williams, head of the Memphis police union, about race relations between the force, its leaders, and its community amid nationwide calls for changes to policing.

More from KCRW

As bars and restaurants reopened for dine-in service in June, hundreds of front-of-the-house workers bore the brunt of a new workplace.

from Greater LA

Last week, the food editor at the LA Times, Peter Meehan, resigned amid accusations of creating a toxic workplace culture.

from Greater LA

In LA County and nationwide, it’s tough to get a quick appointment and fast results.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Latest

The Pentagon and the Department of Health and Human Services are leading a $10 billion program to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. It’s dubbed “Operation Warp Speed.” The name indicates the hope that an effective vaccine can be developed quickly — by January and the start of a new presidential term.

‘Operation Warp Speed’: US government’s $10 million COVID vaccine project

The Pentagon and the Department of Health and Human Services are leading a $10 billion program to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. It’s dubbed “Operation Warp Speed.” The name indicates the hope that an effective vaccine can be developed quickly — by January and the start of a new presidential term.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

San Diego-based scientist Kimberly Prather says when an asymptomatic person speaks, they produce tiny invisible droplets that can travel much farther than six feet.

The danger of COVID aerosol transmission and why masks are key to protection

San Diego-based scientist Kimberly Prather says when an asymptomatic person speaks, they produce tiny invisible droplets that can travel much farther than six feet.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

As coronavirus cases continue to rise, there’s no telling when live music performances will come back.

What happened to the live music industry after the COVID pandemic hit

As coronavirus cases continue to rise, there’s no telling when live music performances will come back.

from Greater LA

As bars and restaurants reopened for dine-in service in June, hundreds of front-of-the-house workers bore the brunt of a new workplace.

Pandemic serves up anxiety for restaurant workers

As bars and restaurants reopened for dine-in service in June, hundreds of front-of-the-house workers bore the brunt of a new workplace.

from Greater LA

More than    17 million Americans    traveled to Europe in 2018, according to the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Travel and Tourism Office.

How banning US travelers affects Europe’s tourism industry

More than 17 million Americans traveled to Europe in 2018, according to the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Travel and Tourism Office.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

On average, the net worth of white families in the U.S. is nearly 10 times that of Black families.

Moving money into Black banks won’t fix economic inequality, says professor

On average, the net worth of white families in the U.S. is nearly 10 times that of Black families.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Supreme Court ruled on two major cases today involving religious freedom.

Supreme Court rules employers can opt out of Obamacare’s birth control mandate

The Supreme Court ruled on two major cases today involving religious freedom.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LA officials say anyone can get tested for coronavirus, symptoms or no symptoms. But appointments are hard to come by, and results can lag by a week or more.

LA County can’t keep up with coronavirus testing demand

LA officials say anyone can get tested for coronavirus, symptoms or no symptoms. But appointments are hard to come by, and results can lag by a week or more.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand