Aaron Kupchik

University of Delaware

Guest

Aaron Kupchik on KCRW

Spring Valley High School near Columbia, South Carolina was the scene of a classroom incident, captured on student videos this week and shown on countless news programs.

Campus Cops: Keeping the Peace or Over-Policing?

Spring Valley High School near Columbia, South Carolina was the scene of a classroom incident, captured on student videos this week and shown on countless news programs.

from To the Point

The President today called Friday's massacre in Connecticut a "wake-up call," but it was only the latest of several mass shootings since he took office.

Stepped-Up School Security and the Impact on Education

The President today called Friday's massacre in Connecticut a "wake-up call," but it was only the latest of several mass shootings since he took office.

from Which Way, L.A.?

The President today called Friday's massacre in Connecticut a "wake-up call," but it was only the latest of several mass shootings since he took office.

Stepped-Up School Security and the Impact on Education

The President today called Friday's massacre in Connecticut a "wake-up call," but it was only the latest of several mass shootings since he took office.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point

Politicians normally go to Hollywood for money. Should Hollywood help them tell better stories instead?

from Left, Right & Center

Author and University of Michigan professor Alexandra Minna Stern traces the origins of America's burgeoning white nationalist movement.

from Scheer Intelligence

A state bill called AB 5 would require businesses that rely on independent contractors to reclassify them as employees and offer benefits such as health insurance and sick pay. There’s…

from KCRW Features

... there's a lot to discuss after last night's Democratic presidential debate.

from Left, Right & Center

In 1950, America had the richest middle class in the world, but now U.S. workers face wage stagnation and historic wealth inequality.

from To the Point

“We can’t recycle our way out of this crisis.” That’s according to California’s Democratic State Senator Ben Allen-- just one of many politicians around the country proposing to ban all straws, bags and other single-use plastics. At the overwhelmed Recycling Center in Burbank, California, Kreigh Hample says, “Our packaging has gone up exponentially in just the last few decades… it’s a sad story in the way we eat, the way we dispose of things and the way that we’re living.” A throwaway culture may be convenient, but the costs include cleaning it up with taxpayer money--not to mention worldwide pollution. China now requires recycled products so pure that the bottom’s gone out of the market, but the plastics industry is bigger than ever. Former EPA official Judith Judith Enck says half the world’s plastics have been produced in the past 13 years. One new process has developed from coal fracking, and development is being encouraged by President Trump with support from the fossil fuel industry. But just 9% of the plastic produced is getting recycled. Some goes to landfills, but the rest turns into worldwide pollution. Images of plastic waste floating by the acre in the Pacific Ocean are all too familiar; microplastics are turning up from the depths of the seas to the remotest parts of the Arctic. In Texas and other states, it’s illegal to ban plastic products. But, in Sacramento, Allen says it’s time to hold the plastics industry accountable. California is big enough to influence the nation’s economy, so his efforts are being scrutinized by politicians and advocates around the country.

from To the Point

In Redding, California, firefighters are still battling the large Mountain Fire that broke out late Thursday morning.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Nearly 200 years ago, the Cherokee Nation signed a treaty with the United States. The result? They were forcibly removed from the Southeastern part of the U.S. to Oklahoma.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand