Adam Arenson

Manhattan College; author of “Banking on Beauty: Millard Sheets and Mid-century Commercial Architecture in California.”

Guest

Associate professor of history and director of the urban studies program at Manhattan College; author of “Banking on Beauty: Millard Sheets and Mid-century Commercial Architecture in California.”


Adam Arenson on KCRW

During the 1950s - 1970s, artist Millard Sheets was commissioned to beautify a chain of home savings banks and many other buildings across California, Texas, New York and Ohio.

How Millard Sheets turned banks into art spaces

During the 1950s - 1970s, artist Millard Sheets was commissioned to beautify a chain of home savings banks and many other buildings across California, Texas, New York and Ohio.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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