Alexandra Natapoff

Professor at Loyola Law School and author of the book “Snitching: Criminal Informants and the Erosion of American Justice.”

Guest

Professor Natapoff’s scholarship has won numerous awards, including the 2013 Law and Society Association Article Prize, two Outstanding Scholarship Awards from the AALS Criminal Justice Section, selection by the Stanford/Yale Junior Faculty Forum, and Honorable Mention in the AALS Scholarly Papers Competition. Her original work on criminal informants has made her a nationally-recognized expert: she has testified before Congress and her book Snitching won the 2010 ABA Silver Gavel Award Honorable Mention for Books. Her current work focuses on misdemeanors and their powerful influence over the criminal system as a whole. In 2012, she spent the summer at NYU School of Law as a Scholar-in-Residence. Professor Natapoff was elected to the American Law Institute in 2007, and appointed as an Adviser to the ALI Principles of Law, Police Investigations Project in 2015. She is quoted frequently by major media outlets.

Prior to joining the academy, Professor Natapoff served as an Assistant Federal Public Defender in Baltimore, Maryland, and was the recipient of an Open Society Institute Community Fellowship. She clerked for the Honorable David S. Tatel, U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia and for the Honorable Paul L. Friedman, U.S. District Court, Washington, D.C.

Alexandra Natapoff on KCRW

A special    committee report    released yesterday found that a “failure of leadership” at the Orange County district attorney's office paved the way for big problems with its…

Orange County D.A. Informant Scandal

A special committee report released yesterday found that a “failure of leadership” at the Orange County district attorney's office paved the way for big problems with its…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The use of jailhouse informants is legal. So is offering informants plea deals in return for testimony. It’s even legal to pay informants for their testimony.

The Ethics and Pitfalls of Using Jailhouse Informants

The use of jailhouse informants is legal. So is offering informants plea deals in return for testimony. It’s even legal to pay informants for their testimony.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Amid news that he is again shifting concepts at Noma, René Redzepi discusses the restaurant’s reinvention. “The Woks of Life” documents the Leung family’s history through food.

from Good Food

Scammers are posing as recruiters and hiring managers, holding interviews, and making offers. Prospective tech workers are the main victims now, but everyone is vulnerable.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Rooftop solar is about to get more expensive, so local solar installers are busy but expecting tough days ahead. The Imperial Valley is known for agriculture.

from Greater LA

In the film “Women Talking,” Mennonite women were drugged and raped by men in their community, and they’re debating whether to fight or leave.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Renowned travel writer and author Pico Iyer reflects on how different cultures and peoples see life and death and find their own versions of happiness and paradise.

from Life Examined

Simran Sethi explores how to reconnect with the earth through mushrooms in her series “Fruiting Bodies” for the Museum of Food and Drink.

from Good Food

Mexican chef Margarita Carrillo Arronte says Americans have the wrong impression of food which isn’t all about comfort — fat and fried.

from Good Food

Monterey Park, the site of a mass shooting on Saturday after the city’s annual Lunar New Year ended, is home to Asian immigrants and mom-and-pop businesses.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The FBI, CIA, NSA and other agencies have historically exploited their power but their limits appear boundless in the modern age.

from Scheer Intelligence