Alexandra Natapoff

Professor at Loyola Law School and author of the book “Snitching: Criminal Informants and the Erosion of American Justice.”

Guest

Professor Natapoff’s scholarship has won numerous awards, including the 2013 Law and Society Association Article Prize, two Outstanding Scholarship Awards from the AALS Criminal Justice Section, selection by the Stanford/Yale Junior Faculty Forum, and Honorable Mention in the AALS Scholarly Papers Competition. Her original work on criminal informants has made her a nationally-recognized expert: she has testified before Congress and her book Snitching won the 2010 ABA Silver Gavel Award Honorable Mention for Books. Her current work focuses on misdemeanors and their powerful influence over the criminal system as a whole. In 2012, she spent the summer at NYU School of Law as a Scholar-in-Residence. Professor Natapoff was elected to the American Law Institute in 2007, and appointed as an Adviser to the ALI Principles of Law, Police Investigations Project in 2015. She is quoted frequently by major media outlets.

Prior to joining the academy, Professor Natapoff served as an Assistant Federal Public Defender in Baltimore, Maryland, and was the recipient of an Open Society Institute Community Fellowship. She clerked for the Honorable David S. Tatel, U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia and for the Honorable Paul L. Friedman, U.S. District Court, Washington, D.C.

Alexandra Natapoff on KCRW

A special    committee report    released yesterday found that a “failure of leadership” at the Orange County district attorney's office paved the way for big problems with its…

Orange County D.A. Informant Scandal

A special committee report released yesterday found that a “failure of leadership” at the Orange County district attorney's office paved the way for big problems with its…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The use of jailhouse informants is legal. So is offering informants plea deals in return for testimony. It’s even legal to pay informants for their testimony.

The Ethics and Pitfalls of Using Jailhouse Informants

The use of jailhouse informants is legal. So is offering informants plea deals in return for testimony. It’s even legal to pay informants for their testimony.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Following the January 6 insurrection at the U.S.

from Greater LA

The drive to force a vote on removing Gavin Newsom from office is picking up steam, spurred on by anger over coronavirus restrictions and other conservative grievances.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

The nation’s capital will have extensive military presence next week when Joe Biden takes the oath of office and becomes the 46th U.S. president.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Warren Olney talks about the U.S.

from To the Point

George Clooney exclusively told KCRW that President Donald Trump and his family will be put “into the dustbin of history” after a Trump-supporting mob besieged the Capitol building on…

from The Business

Are some people more deserving than others? Should queues and priorities apply to everyone or should some people be able to jump ahead?

from Second Opinion

Facebook has banned President Trump, at least until his term is over. Twitter issued a 12-hour suspension of his account on Wednesday.

from Hollywood Breakdown

Following the insurrection at the U.S.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The peaceful transition of power for the first time in US history appeared to hang in the balance this week.

from Life Examined